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Very Famous Person
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
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On a ride this morning, cresting a hill on a two lane, when suddenly there was a row of cars and motorhome approaching in the other lane and a Jeep in my lane heading right for me. I'd say probably a couple of hundred feet (which goes real fast when you're both going a total of 130 mph).

I saw him jerk his wheel over but probably couldn't get in-between cars so he straightened out. I remember thinking, "I hope he doesn't roll or crash since then we're probably both screwed." I made a quick swerve to the right onto the shoulder which fortunately was paved there. (On most of the 230 miles on this route, there is no shoulder at all.)

I just kept going as if nothing happened. I would guess the Jeep guy was doing some soul searching for a while though.

Funny thing. I wasn't angry or scared or shaken up at all. I suppose in part since I realize my reactions saved my hide. Many times in my life I have imagined what I would do if.... Then when it happened I didn't have to go through all the thinking process since I had already planned an outcome.

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That will definitely make you think Ron, hopefully that jeep driver too. About 15 years ago the wife and I barely missed getting hit head on in our van by a lady that had fallen asleep and was coming in fast in our lane. We were on a narrow 2 lane road, no shoulders, steep cliffs on our left, and a barbed wire fence along a field on our right. They say when you fall asleep driving, your foot presses on the accelerator, must be true as she had to have been doing 90 on a road suitable for 50 max. At the last seconds, she must have woke up, whipped the wheel to her left, shot through the fence, and spun around a dozen times before her car stopped about 50 yards out in the field - never rolled over, nobody hurt, thank God.
 

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I thought about buying a farm. It's a lot of work.

Glad you're okay, RonK, and had the wherewithal to take evasive action rather than freeze up or just grab fistfuls of brakes.
 

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Subversive
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On a ride this morning, cresting a hill on a two lane, when suddenly there was a row of cars and motorhome approaching in the other lane and a Jeep in my lane heading right for me. I'd say probably a couple of hundred feet (which goes real fast when you're both going a total of 130 mph).

I saw him jerk his wheel over but probably couldn't get in-between cars so he straightened out. I remember thinking, "I hope he doesn't roll or crash since then we're probably both screwed." I made a quick swerve to the right onto the shoulder which fortunately was paved there. (On most of the 230 miles on this route, there is no shoulder at all.)

I just kept going as if nothing happened. I would guess the Jeep guy was doing some soul searching for a while though.

Funny thing. I wasn't angry or scared or shaken up at all. I suppose in part since I realize my reactions saved my hide. Many times in my life I have imagined what I would do if.... Then when it happened I didn't have to go through all the thinking process since I had already planned an outcome.

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Phenomenal reaction....

Funny how so often there's a shoulder (or something else) when we really need it....

Glad you're ok.
 

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American Legion Rider
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It's amazing what we can do in that split second sometimes. Pants changing situations are not fun. Sure glad you came through just fine. It takes me awhile to get those heart stopping moments behind me and for good. :thumbsup:
 

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Gone
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That is why it pays to look ahead and have a plan for "What if". This might have been a situation that wouldn't have turned out so well if you were in a wider vehicle at the time.
 

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Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
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Farms are a lot of work, sunup to sundown and all that crap. Glad you didn't buy it.
 

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ZAMM Fanatic
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My fear in those head-on situations is that the oncoming driver and I will BOTH decide to do the same thing --- go off the road in the same direction, or I'll decide to split the oncoming traffic the same moment the driver finds a gap he can slip back into. You don't get a second chance if one or both of you decides wrong.

I'm glad it worked out for you Ronk.

I made a really bad pass a month or so ago. On a double yellow. I decided to pass a CDOT dump truck creeping over Red Mountain pass. Through the trees I could see an 18 wheeler down the road a ways and knew, coming into a curve, I could go ahead and pass the construction truck, that I'd have plenty of time before ANY 18 wheeler crawling up a 9500' mountainside arrived at the turn.

I didn't see a midsized 4 wheeler in front of the 18 wheeler, hidden by the trees. The cager put two tires on the shoulder and I barely missed clipping the front bumper of the CDOT truck pulling back in.

Cager saved MY life that day.
 

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Long line of cars in a bunch on a heavily traveled stretch of state highway coming toward me. There were no cars a half mile ahead of me or a half mile behind me. Dude pulls out of the crowd with no time to do much. I picked my line which had to be a shallow swerve or I was in the ditch. I looked where I wanted to be instead of anything else.

They passed so close that I felt the air from the car.....

Glad you guys survived. Now when I ride a heavily traveled road, I just tuck in behind the first cage I come across and think of him as my personal battering ram.
 

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It's amazing what we can do in that split second sometimes. Pants changing situations are not fun. Sure glad you came through just fine. It takes me awhile to get those heart stopping moments behind me and for good. :thumbsup:
You telling me, a few years ago I got distracted by something and the car in front of me stopped. I looked up too late for breaks and swerved for the shoulder and knew I wouldn't make it but I did, I don't know how. I stopped got off the bike shaking like a leaf, took me a half hour to clean my pants.
 

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Safe riding includes always slowing down and covering the brake and clutch anytime that you can't see the road ahead. Coming over the crest of a hill or on a blind curve, anything could be on the road such as a stalled car, a dead deer, and someone coming toward you trying to pass another vehicle. Once my wife asked me if my bike was underpowered, and I asked her why she asked. She said whenever we were heading up a small hill the bike really slowed down before we reached the top. She thought it was because the bike lacked the power to maintain speed uphill with two of us on the bike. I explained to her that it was me letting off on the throttle since I could not see what was over the crest. Bad things can happen under any conditions, but some are more likely to become a problem than others, so whenever possible you should take whatever actions you can to make things safer. Usually that just involves slowing down and possibly taking a different position within your lane. Glad to hear your close call ended well.
 

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Very Famous Person
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
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I suppose we all have close situations in life. It's those that have the same but DON'T have the luck that are the fatalities. As I see it, there are three ways to ride (other than totally safely all the time).

One is to be a careless fool and always be riding on the edge, thereby increasing the chances of a close call of the bad kind. This is that guy on the sportbike with the ballcap on backwards, wearing shorts, and cutting in and out of traffic as if the roadway obstacles were nothing but practice cones.

Second is to just ride along blissfully in the hope of never having a close encounter. This person never bothers to practice his maneuvers of avoidance, fast or slow, and always follows the same path around curves, in traffic, or in deer country. Of course I do envy the person who's lucky more than the one who's smart. But we can't choose luck.

Third is the rider who can recognise the potential grades of danger and rides accordingly. In traffic it's being where you can avoid cages and anticipating what they may do. It's wearing appropriate gear. (Reminder note: in my last crash, I broke ribs and bones and scrambled my insides even with ATG.) It's positioning your bike in curves so you have the most options for something unseen. In forest, it's moderating speed and staying away from the edge of the roadway. And so on.

I always have the habit of using the track near the middle of the two lane road until meeting an approaching cage or cresting a hill when I move to the outside track to keep more room for escape if necessary. Works for me.

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Shaper Of All Things Metal
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Ronk, glad your instincts brought you through a bad situation.

Coming up on the crest of a hill is like opening a surprise box, you never know what's there.

I had the opposite situation a month ago. Heading into a long dip in the road I could see a long line of traffic on the other end of the dip with a car in the middle of the line impatiently sticking their nose out, looking for a chance to pass. They either didn't see me or didn't care and whipped out into my lane to pass. It was like everything went into slow motion as I eased to the edge, just missing each other by inches.

There are plenty of 'me first' idiots on the road who have no patience at all and will put other drivers in danger without a second thought.
 

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American Legion Rider
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I have a tendency to stand up just to give me that extra second to see what's over the hill. I've been surprised a few times with ranchers moving a heard from one side to the other. The nation split many ranches instead of going around them. Before the roads they never had to move livestock. Now they do. It's not the ranchers fault in 99% of the time. It was their land first before it became emanate domain land. My little ranch has a road that T's into it. Same owner on both sides of that road and no reason to even have it except it cuts several minutes of travel time going around it. Today, sometimes it's the only road open to even get out since they don't take very good care of any of the roads here. So now it becomes a needed road.
 

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This is basically what I do also, with the exception that I generally move toward the outside of curves I am approaching, except when there is some condition present that gives me a reason not to.

Good reaction! Good riding! I'm thankful you're still with us, and all in one healthy piece, to boot.

I always have the habit of using the track near the middle of the two lane road until meeting an approaching cage or cresting a hill when I move to the outside track to keep more room for escape if necessary. Works for me.
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