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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m looking for a nice cheap motorcycle I could buy to cruise everyday from school and back on the highway.Im 160something pounds and 6ft tall. I would like to know some of the safest and cheapest options for me to drive.
 

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Welcome to the forum:smile_big:

First take a certified safety course and get your passing certificate or no company will insure you:smile:

With no experience, I'd suggest a used cruiser of some kind or a small dualsport bike or even a 150 up scooter as they are all readily available and cheap.:grin:

Get good riding gear and a good helmet and be real careful:wink2:

Sam:nerd:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yeah obviously I definitely will, though is a 150 good enough for going on the freeway where I have to go over a small hill.
 

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It's great that you are interested in learning about motorcycles! Yay and welcome to the hobby!

The beginner rider course will answer a lot of your questions, get you licensed and insured, and will also let you discover if motorcycling is for you. It's a lot better to make your beginner mistakes on a training range than at 80mph on a congested freeway. The Harley classes cost more, but will put you on a 500 pound, 500cc motorcycle that is realistically capable of street riding. I have done both and both were great.

Cheap is also relative. Budget some money for gear. You will need a few hundred dollars for the basic helmet, gloves, jacket and boots. You can go used for some stuff, but not really with helmets.

As for a bike: I recommend a 500-ish cc motorcycle! They have enough giddy-up to get out of the way of traffic! The Yamaha Virago/V-Star line is one of the most comfortable, easy to ride and inexpensive options out there. If you can find one of those in good shape, you will probably be happy for many years.

Then again, there is a BMW G310R in my garage. It is only 313cc but it makes 34 horsepower, has fuel injection and ABS, looks absolutely fantastic, and costs about $5k brand new, out the door.
 

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For most starters I recommend a 250 or 500 Ninja. They are simple and easy to ride, get great mileage, aren't scary powerful like their big brothers, and there are an abundance of them for sale under a couple grand.

Also, what BWB75 said about gear. Helmet, gloves and boots are highly recommended. Gloves to me are the second most important piece of gear, I don't buy cheap ones. You operate the clutch, throttle and front brake with your hands, and a good grip means everything to me.
 

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What has already been stated, great advice.
Plus...Please do not be as a I was (such a long time ago), a super confident 16 year old with the cheapest helmet and the thinnest leather gloves. All the gear All the time seems like a good trend. Do you research and use your credit card to buy the best gear that you can afford before you ride.
I am going to take courses to try to regain skills that I may have only thought that I had.
Ride safe and best of luck
Thank you,
Cas
 

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Hello Novice Teen, Welcome from St. Pete, Florida.

Yup, Porky has the right idea, no doubt your head is swimming with ?'s about motorcycles.
Taking the MSF course will be the first step of your motorcycle education, do your self a
BIG favor and don't let it be the last, there are some pretty good books out there all about
our Hobby, bopping into Barnes & Noble will tell you that.

Check out RideLikeAPro.com Jerry Palladino is a motorcycle officer or was and has a great
way to help you, me an anyone who wants to improve their low speed skills, you can see
him do the U-turn, something that had me hung up for a while, but a few hours on a few
Saturdays had me doing as GREAT job on the offset-cone weave, then the U-turns.
 
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