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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I'm currently 15 and will be turning 16 in the beginning of September 2018. I want to get my motorcycle licence in Ontario as soon as I turn 16 but I want to know if it's worth it for the safety risks and cost. If I do get my licence I plan on taking a course and I've been looking at used bikes to possibly purchase and I found a 1973 Triumph Bonneville T140 with 10,000km for $5,000 and was wondering if its a good bike for a first time rider or has too much displacement? I would also be open to other recommendations. Some information for reference is that I'm a 5'6"-5'7"(I'm unsure of my height, sorry) female, and I weigh around 110lbs or around 50kgs.
 

· On The Road Again!
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I don't know anything about the Triumph, but if I recall, the Bonneville is a fast bike, maybe too fast.
But safety I can talk about.
This summer will be 50 years on two wheels for me, and my brother also.
And I have a lot of friends who have been riding nearly as long.
Motorcycling can be very safe...if YOU are!
I'm also a pilot. Pilots have a good saying that applies to motorcycling equally well. It goes:
"There are old pilots, and there are bold pilots. But there are no old, bold pilots".
Think about it.....and be careful.
If you do, in 50 years you will be telling some young person
the same thing.
 

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Great to see that you want to get a bike, but I don't think a T140 is for a new rider. I owned a 73 T140 - it was a great bike but definitely not for beginners. The power, the maintenance, the lunacy...

Get something a bit more mild and save the sweet Triumph for a graduation gift. Just my opinion.

If you want something older get an old-ish Honda. They're easy to ride and it will allow you to concentrate on building your riding skillset for the first couple years.
 

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Something like a CM400 Honda would be better IMO.
The 73 Triumphs were probably the best of the original brand, but they were not that great. The front disc and five speed should be on that bike. Good ones are advertised for over $10,000 out West, but I caution, they were not good bikes when new.

Maybe after riding for a few years, plus a bit of maintenance practice, something like the Triumph would be interesting.
I have owned, sold and rode many British bikes. Even raced one of the worlds fastest Nortons. After a lot of thought I can honestly say, Never Again.

The new generation Triumphs are quite good according from what I hear and read. After riding for a while, a good used newer Triumph could work.

UK
 

· On The Road Again!
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There's something I hadn't thought about....Maintenance.
You'd better be a good mechanic, because you'll be working on that old Triumph nearly as much as you'll be riding it.
Unkle Krusty is right. They were not great bikes. There is a reason that Triumph and all the other British companies went out of business in the '70s.
That reason is spelled "Honda".

Just remember, in 1973, Triumph was still making bikes that vibrated like heck, leaked oil, and needed constant work.
In 1975, Honda came out with the Goldwing that ran smooth as silk and
would run to 100,000 miles with little or no maintenance.
That was the end of the British motorcycle industry.
 

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There are so many recent model bikes out there for a lot less than $5k. An old bike like the Triumph is going to take effort to keep running all the time and it's not nearly as well built and reliable as something that is just a few years old. As an example: a couple years back I bought my son a new 2014 Suzuki S40 for only $4,500 out the door. It was a 2.5 year old brand new bike that was still in the factory crate. The web is full of nearly new bikes.

As far as safe...yes and no. Motorcycles are inherently more dangerous than cars as you're exposed. Also, a mistake on a bike can really hurt. A lot depends on you, your maturity and your mentality.

Sent from my Nexus 6 using Tapatalk
 

· Biker
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I think a 'New Rider' might be better off not using the bike to go to work, yeah it might be fun and all that, BUT if you need to work and most of us do, and you have other means of getting to work, I would suggest using other means. For the most part there is a lot of traffic during 7-9 am and 4-6 pm, people are in a hurry to punch in on time, you don't want to compete for road space at these times as you could be forced to ride above your skills, that is not good.

Ride at a time the traffic is lighter, biking is supposed to be an enjoy-able hobby, not wracked with nervousness, you will get better with practice, AND get out in an open parking lot that is not used and practice low speed skills, brake an swerve, tight S turns and U-turns. Do not let the Motorcycle course you got your license to ride with, be your LAST in motorcycle education. . .That way you'll be riding a lot longer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I'm looking to ride a bike because it's something I've always loved and wanted to do rather than as a means of transportation. And even if I was to ride it to school it would only be a 5 minute ride. But thanks for the advice and I definitely plan on getting lots of practice and going to multiple classes.
 
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