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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all, new user to the forums here :)

So I'm looking to get a bike, something to move me to and from work and school (10 miles max a day). Been checkin craigslist a lot as I can't really afford much. The bike I came across was this one listed here.

tampa.craigslist.org/pnl/mcy/4922281736.html

Now a little background. I'm 18, no licenses, only driven a few times and were on mopeds :(:(
I'm not very tall either, 5'6 at best. Now, I'm not afraid of a bike, and not afraid of the road, but I do respect it. Spent a lot of time riding a bicycle around the whole county and noticed people mostly suck at driving (Florida). I don't weigh much, 145 lbs. I know the bike is cheap, but it looks great to me at least. I'm just looking for something to get me to and from. Nothing fancy.

"A few typical mechanical issues for an old bike header leaks a bit"

That stuck out to me, how hard is it to work on something like this? And anything else "typical" that goes wrong with on of these bikes?

Sorry for all the questions but I'm really excited.

Oh and a note is that right now it's between deciding on this bike, or a TMS 200cc GS bike. Sports, but from what I've seen, seems like crud than anything else and its more expensive.

Thanks, all :biggrin::biggrin:
 

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I think most would advise taking the BRC and getting your license before doing anything else.

Some people have the confidence to do a larger/heavier first bike, but I think for most riders smaller is better because pushing a big heavy bike isn't as easy as it looks on TV.

The problem with an inexpensive 30+ year old bike is the often have mechanical issues that need addressed like the header leak mentioned in the ad. If you've got the cash and/or skills to fix them, great, but if not, the bike will probably spend more time in the garage than on the road. Finding parts for older bikes can be tough too and there's ongoing maintenance that needs to be done. That'll cost money as well.

I'd try to save some more money for a better bike. If you're patient you should be able to find some older bikes like the Honda Rebel, Suzuki S40, Ninja 250 and Yamaha Vstar to name a few that are solid beginner bikes that will allow you to ramp your skill set up and meet your needs for not too much more money.

Avoid the impulse to buy because if you don't, you're likely to get a much worse deal. You're 18. There still have plenty of time to figure things out and get the right bike.
 

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18,651 Posts
Learning to ride takes a bike that is in good running order. The least little hiccup can cause a big problem. And you want to spend your time actually learning to ride versus learning to wrench. Old bikes and new riders just don't mix unless you want to learn how to fix and restore a bike while you wait to take a Basic Riding Course. Then by all means have at it. Smaller bikes are better to learn on. Little mistakes are less likely to cause you major harm. It does seem impossible but panic while twisting the throttle and not being able to stop it is a fact. It takes time to learn how to not do that. Or braking and still twisting the throttle. It happens. I do suggest a Basic Riding Course for those skills learned properly to start with. You'll still need months of practice afterward. You can be a long time rider or a short time but injured past rider. Do not think it can't happen to you. IT CAN! Anyway...

 
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