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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 78 750 hondamatic. I would like to turn it to a bobber,cafe or a chopper. Should i chop and weld the original frame or start with a new frame? What else should i know about the build?
 

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I'd say it depends on your ability to cut, weld, and grind steel, as well as your understanding of your bike's systems and how comfortable you are making changes to the frame geometry, placement points, and so forth.

I don't know if anyone is making new bobbed frames for a Hondamatic, but if you can't find such a thing then you'll have to set to work on the frame you have. Good luck!
 

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This "Hondamatic" of yours sounds rather antique, just by the name!

I admit to knowing nothing about them, but thanks for stirring my interest in looking it up!

Hold on............I'll do a quick Google Search...........

Ah yes!! One of these!!!! Cool!!!! What kinda condition is yours in?????



Pictures, man.........pictures!!!

-Soupy
 

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Discussion Starter #4
excellent

I wont be doing the work myself. I have a guy who builds all the time that will do that for me. I just wanted to get other opinions since it is such a rare bike. He is all about being unique and doesnt really care about "preservation" so to speak. This is the bike i have been looking for for years and i finally found it and it is in excellent condition. I MEAN EXCELLENT! Idont plan on ever selling it but there is always that very slim chance. It was totally unmolested when i bought it, no black smoke,cold started right up, no misses, dings or scratches. I mean clean. So i want an original bike but do i want it at the expense of tearing up such a beautiful bike? I will post pics on my way out the door to work. Thanks
 

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I would break it down to a simple math equation, personally. There are some nice 750 rigid frames for sale out there - can you have yours cut and welded cheaper than buying one. You'll also have to research how easy it is to register a custom construction bike in your state. The old frame has a VIN, so that might make that a better option.

Here's a couple: http://www.cyclexchange.net/frame__end.htm

Either way, let us know how it goes!
 

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You could very quickly put more money into chopping the bike then you could get by selling it right now. Chopping a bike will almost never add to it's value, but that bike doesn't have a whole lot of monetary value right now anyway, so I'd say it depends on whether you want to ride an original bike or a modified scoot.
 

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You GOTTA LOVE GOOGLE for finding even the most obscure things :D seeing other peoples creations can help inspire what direction your project goes..

Here's a Hondamatic Bobber. I see the appeal in building one

 

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Discussion Starter #8
If it is the original frame but mod,do i have to reregister it? And you would be surprised what people would pay for this bike. I paid 800 and got an offer for 2000 about a week ago. Its a smaller market but its out there. I would think it would b easier to just work with the original frame if it doesnt save me money it should save time with finding one atleast...maybe....cross fingers....hopefully.....
 

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My guess is that if you are using the original frame, you won't have to re-register the motorcycle as long as you keep the part with the serial number stamped on it.
 

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CB750 SOHC frame lend itself very well to Cafe Racer just by cutting the seat rails down. This is something you can do on your own with just an angle grinder.

www.pinterest.com.jpg
 

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If it were me I would go with a new frame, keep the old frame in case you want to go back to original at some time.

That bike is a classic, and it's value in good stock condition I believe will increase.
 

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I am not surprised that you got offered two grand for the bike. The CB750 is the giant killer that changed motorcycle history. The Hondamatic is a rare variant of that bike. From a strictly collector point of view, that means that there are not many left. There are plenty of rare [in numbers] bikes out there,but this is a popular bike. The fact that Honda brought out the new CB1100 as a pattern of this bike should also be a clue that you have the style that has stood the test of time. This bike is the '65 mustang of the Honda line IMO. The SOHC engines are more desired than the DOHC,BTW.

What is happening in Japan is some of the older guys with money want the big Honda bikes that were sold in the USA. Japan built them,but generally rode smaller bikes. There are people in my area who are buying the old ones and a shipper in California gets a truckload and ships them back to Japan.

Another reason I would not molest that bike is --if you want a cafe' racer.you want it to have certain paramaters,and an automatic tranny is not one of them as it slows the performance of the bike

The only bike that I would Cafe' is an old beater that has cosmetic problems.
 

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goddessrp, I am curious - why the Hondamatic instead of a standard 750? The auto trans in those tends to make the bike a bit lazy. Not a criticism, just curiosity..
 

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Does the engine & tranny work ok? There must be a reason Honda abandoned the "automatic" transmission. I hope it wasn't a reliability concern.

How many miles on the bike? From what I understand, it's not exactly a "true automatic" transmission. Meaning you still have to manually change gears, but there is no clutch. Umm,, right?
 

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I had a new 1976 CB750A and loved it!

Honda abandoned production because "Real motorcyclist" don't ride bikes with an auto-trans. Hog wash.

They dropped the PC800 for some stupid reason also. I had a new 1989 PC800 and it was ahead of it's time.

They were extremely reliable because the new trans was attached to arguably the best and most reliable engine in history, the CB750. The 2 speed trans could be started out in 1st or 2nd but it didn't shift itself. It was a real automotive type trans with a real torque converter!

They are a HOT item now and command a good price on the 'classic market.'

To 'BOB' one to me would be like painting a mustache on the Mona Lisa---but to each his own.

My new 1974 CB750 was $1,700 new and the 76 auto was a few hundred more, just for comparison.
 

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I looked on a couple cycle trader sites and the ones I saw were only asking about 2,500, with some a little more. Pretty inexpensive for a hot item motorcycle.
 

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Does the engine & tranny work ok? There must be a reason Honda abandoned the "automatic" transmission. I hope it wasn't a reliability concern.

How many miles on the bike? From what I understand, it's not exactly a "true automatic" transmission. Meaning you still have to manually change gears, but there is no clutch. Umm,, right?
Honda has not abandoned an auto transmission. Less than a year ago my local
dealer was trying to sell me a brand new auto transmission bike made by Honda.
 
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