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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Seriously who cares how close your motorcycle dealer is to you unless they are a close friend.
High end product is easier to work on, it's the cheap stuff that is near impossible to fix. That applies to almost every machine you buy.
I don’t have experience working on bikes. I’ve only worked on my Ninja 400, and even some simple things on it seem difficult to me. I don’t aspire to be a mechanic, I would be fine doing any small jobs or mods but if I crashed it, or I couldn’t figure out what’s wrong, or wanted a big install done like a tune or full system exhaust, id wanna bring it to someone who knows better than me.
 

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Seriously who cares how close your motorcycle dealer is to you unless they are a close friend.
High end product is easier to work on, it's the cheap stuff that is near impossible to fix. That applies to almost every machine you buy.
It matters if you need the dealer to work on the bike for you, especially a less popular make like Triumph or BMW. You can't take one of those bikes to a Japanese bike dealership and expect them to work on it.
 

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I remember in the 1990's when BMW closed All of the Ontario dealerships and started again from scratch, the only one at that time for all of Ontario was in Pickering and they had just started with a new mechanic that had fresh training.

There is only one way to gain experience with working on your motorcycles and that's to start working on them yourself.
If you can afford other people to service your motorcycles, you are going to need very deep pockets and be ready for lots of wait time. I was lucky, I had no choice, if I wanted to ride them I had to learn how to fix them or it was never happening.
 

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I remember in the 1990's when BMW closed All of the Ontario dealerships and started again from scratch, the only one at that time for all of Ontario was in Pickering and they had just started with a new mechanic that had fresh training.

There is only one way to gain experience with working on your motorcycles and that's to start working on them yourself.
If you can afford other people to service your motorcycles, you are going to need very deep pockets and be ready for lots of wait time. I was lucky, I had no choice, if I wanted to ride them I had to learn how to fix them or it was never happening.
Maybe he has deep pockets. Or maybe some people, especially a new guy on a street bike, isn't willing to trust poor mechanic skills or inexperience on things like brakes, tires, etc. Some of us are just lazy. While it may not be a thing to you, that doesn't mean it's not a thing to him.
 

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Thinking of all the dealerships that I bought motorcycle stuff from over the last half century and how many are still in existence, the numbers are bleak. Thinking of how many of those dealers were ever any good at mechanics anyway, only two that I know of are the two still in business after 50 years, Dave and Woody.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Maybe he has deep pockets. Or maybe some people, especially a new guy on a street bike, isn't willing to trust poor mechanic skills or inexperience on things like brakes, tires, etc. Some of us are just lazy. While it may not be a thing to you, that doesn't mean it's not a thing to him.
Exactly, no, I am not rich. And like I stated before, I am willing to learn and to do some work on the bike. But if I’m going to spend something like $15000 on a bike, I dare not do any major installations that could lead to me getting myself killed if I mess something up. I know my skill and experience and confidence levels when it comes to this stuff. And I know you learn by doing, but I am not gonna go install velocity stacks, full exhaust and new brakes, chain and rotors with no one to help or guide me but a video with poor angles. I have no friends or family who has ever ridden motorcycles before, so I am very new to the scene.
 

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I don't think you ought to feel bad to have someone service your bike. I've ridden most of my life but only started doing maintenance and some upgrades the last 5 years, when I finally had more time and room for some tools. I still don't change my own tires and I lean on my mechanic that I really trust for advice and anything I don't want to tackle. I will say that if you get the urge to learn to do some of the work, it is very rewarding and will bring you closer to your bike. But we all are different and you should be you.

Even though I have three bikes, I think I've spent more on tools than I've saved doing maintenance myself. I hope to be riding long enough to justify them more but once you start buying tools it's easy to talk yourself into another.

Also, I've had lots of mechanics I couldn't trust and I love supporting the one that we have here in Hopkinsville that actually knows what he's doing and does his best to be fair. I hope you can find one you like. Actually, I've got a car mechanic AND a motorcycle mechanic that are top notch. Maybe you should just move to western Ky. We sure have plenty of open jobs.

And for your original question, you've got good answers from everybody, but my vote would be for SV650, FZ6R, or MT07.
 

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I don't think you ought to feel bad to have someone service your bike. I've ridden most of my life but only started doing maintenance and some upgrades the last 5 years, when I finally had more time and room for some tools. I still don't change my own tires and I lean on my mechanic that I really trust for advice and anything I don't want to tackle. I will say that if you get the urge to learn to do some of the work, it is very rewarding and will bring you closer to your bike. But we all are different and you should be you.

Even though I have three bikes, I think I've spent more on tools than I've saved doing maintenance myself. I hope to be riding long enough to justify them more but once you start buying tools it's easy to talk yourself into another.

Also, I've had lots of mechanics I couldn't trust and I love supporting the one that we have here in Hopkinsville that actually knows what he's doing and does his best to be fair. I hope you can find one you like. Actually, I've got a car mechanic AND a motorcycle mechanic that are top notch. Maybe you should just move to western Ky. We sure have plenty of open jobs.

And for your original question, you've got good answers from everybody, but my vote would be for SV650, FZ6R, or MT07.
They will pay off. In my opinion, tools are free if I learn how to use em.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
I don't think you ought to feel bad to have someone service your bike. I've ridden most of my life but only started doing maintenance and some upgrades the last 5 years, when I finally had more time and room for some tools. I still don't change my own tires and I lean on my mechanic that I really trust for advice and anything I don't want to tackle. I will say that if you get the urge to learn to do some of the work, it is very rewarding and will bring you closer to your bike. But we all are different and you should be you.

Even though I have three bikes, I think I've spent more on tools than I've saved doing maintenance myself. I hope to be riding long enough to justify them more but once you start buying tools it's easy to talk yourself into another.

Also, I've had lots of mechanics I couldn't trust and I love supporting the one that we have here in Hopkinsville that actually knows what he's doing and does his best to be fair. I hope you can find one you like. Actually, I've got a car mechanic AND a motorcycle mechanic that are top notch. Maybe you should just move to western Ky. We sure have plenty of open jobs.

And for your original question, you've got good answers from everybody, but my vote would be for SV650, FZ6R, or MT07.
Thanks man, I appreciate the kind words. I have invested in some tools, and I see how always finding better ones to make things faster could become addicting lol. I’ve been able to find a good car mechanic who doesn’t rip me off like most, when looking up reviews on motorcycle shops near me, most have pretty mediocre reviews but one place, “Tapped Out Cycles” near me has really great reviews. I got caught out in the rain and low sided my bike through a turn 2 months ago, unfortunately they were booked out for 3 weeks so I decided to lookup manuals and order the parts to fix it myself, fortunately nothing has fallen off or broken since I fixed it so I think I’m safe. 😂
 

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Thanks man, I appreciate the kind words. I have invested in some tools, and I see how always finding better ones to make things faster could become addicting lol. I’ve been able to find a good car mechanic who doesn’t rip me off like most, when looking up reviews on motorcycle shops near me, most have pretty mediocre reviews but one place, “Tapped Out Cycles” near me has really great reviews. I got caught out in the rain and low sided my bike through a turn 2 months ago, unfortunately they were booked out for 3 weeks so I decided to lookup manuals and order the parts to fix it myself, fortunately nothing has fallen off or broken since I fixed it so I think I’m safe. 😂
I have a wide variety of tools. I spent a bunch on used Snap On, Williams, SK and Mac on Ebay several years ago. Recently I have discovered Sunex, which are made in Taiwan and a good deal for the money. I have invested more than I should have, but I'm okay with it. I'm an okay wrench but still have a lot to learn. One thing I know for sure is that with a good tool in my hand I have less chance of turning the whole thing into an abortion than I do if my tools are cheap.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
One thing I know for sure is that with a good tool in my hand I have less chance of turning the whole thing into an abortion than I do if my tools are cheap.
I couldn't relate more... My first ever mod to my bike was a fender eliminator. I didn't even own sockets LOL. I literally was out here with an adjustable wrench, pliers and screwdrivers doing my best. I got it done but it was so much more difficult. Ended up buying a few tools after that experience.
 

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I couldn't relate more... My first ever mod to my bike was a fender eliminator. I didn't even own sockets LOL. I literally was out here with an adjustable wrench, pliers and screwdrivers doing my best. I got it done but it was so much more difficult. Ended up buying a few tools after that experience.
Yep. Back in nthe day I worked at a hospital and rode my bike to work, which saved me $7 a day in parking over driving a car. I took that money and started buying tools with it. Every two or three weeks I could buy a set of some sort. Over the course of a year I put together a nice collection. Then I wrecked my bike and it was over. But those tools ate still my go-to and they will last me a lifetime. Additionally, anytime a project comes along, I take a good look at it and determine whether or not I can do it, if I have the time, wherewithal, etc. If I decide to go for it and I need a tool I don't have, I go for it, and I buy a good one. No tool costs as much as the labor of paying someone else to do it.
 

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From what I've seen; all of the best riders are intimately familiar with their own motorcycles and only one guy with a #1 plate on his bike has a sponsored mechanic to make it all happen free and easy. That only works during the sponsored race season for him, so even that guy is working on his own motorcycles right now.

If I had to take my motorcycles to a shop to have them fixed, I would have never started riding motorcycles, it simply would never have been even remotely possible. ymmv.
 

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From what I've seen; all of the best riders are intimately familiar with their own motorcycles and only one guy with a #1 plate on his bike has a sponsored mechanic to make it all happen free and easy. That only works during the sponsored race season for him, so even that guy is working on his own motorcycles right now.

If I had to take my motorcycles to a shop to have them fixed, I would have never started riding motorcycles, it simply would never have been even remotely possible. ymmv.
Your experience is your own.

If he buys a new Japanese bike the cost of routine maintenance at a shop is likely to be low. A few hundred dollars every couple years for annual services and a bigger bill every few years.
 

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Your experience is your own.

If he buys a new Japanese bike the cost of routine maintenance at a shop is likely to be low. A few hundred dollars every couple years for annual services and a bigger bill every few years.
What are shop service rates where you live? Here they are a hundred bucks an hour plus HST of 13% and that's before you put a single part on the bike or expensive oil in the engine. Tires cost as much to change, mount and balance as to buy, brakes and bearings need cleaning and servicing more often then replacing. But you are correct in that if you don't ride them much, you don't need to service them much.

I just ripped apart one of my Sea-Doo's to change the oil and replace the battery, by doing it myself I probably saved about eight hundred dollars. It's only the second time I had one of those things apart. Not much to them once you know your way around a motorcycle.
 

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$125 an hour at my Triumph dealer.

Let's say he puts on 5k a year on his new bike. He needs an oil change per year for the first two years, then a full service for year 3. A total of $1000 for three years. If a guy can't afford that, he can't afford motorcycling, IMO.
 

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I like your numbers except that hourly rate. That's 150$ per hour canadian,
do you know any motorcycle mechanic worth that kind of money?

For that money he better be coming to my house to fix it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
For the most part around me it seems to be $90-$125/hr. There is one or two places closer to $80/hr but I have never brought my bike anywhere so idk who’s good.
 

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I'm up to needing 6 batteries right now, 2 for a truck, 2 for sea-doo's, 1 lawn tractor battery and a motorcycle battery. That should be a grand easy right there before I buy fluids and filters for all those machines. Can you imagine how much that would cost to take that stuff to a dealer to service, I can't. Those sea-doo's, you have to take the entire top of the plastic boat off just to get to anything, that's good for an hour right there, just to open and close the hood.
I'd go broke real fast. ymmv.
 

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I like your numbers except that hourly rate. That's 150$ per hour canadian,
do you know any motorcycle mechanic worth that kind of money?

For that money he better be coming to my house to fix it.
He's not Canadian. And I live in an expensive area. If I'm getting my brakes done and don't believe I can do them myself, does it matter what it costs?

I tell new people this all the time. Gas is (usually) cheaper on a motorcycle. Everything else is expensive. Don't get a motorcycle if you want to save money on transportation.
 
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