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Drained clutch fluid, cannot build up pressure! bled both ways until nothing but fluid, no air bubbles, still will not disengage or build up pressure! frustrating....
 

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Put a rubber band around the level and let it sit compressed over night. That'll drive bubbles to the top.

Did it work fine before you changed the fluid? Is the pull stiff and just no pressure at the end? Old fluid gets thick and eventually solidifies. You could have a clog.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Put a rubber band around the level and let it sit compressed over night. That'll drive bubbles to the top.

Did it work fine before you changed the fluid? Is the pull stiff and just no pressure at the end? Old fluid gets thick and eventually solidifies. You could have a clog.
Worked ok before, just grabbing at the end of the extension. Just thought I'd change since I just bought it and the other fluids were shitty.... The pull has no pressure, not disengaging.
 

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@Joe Z
It would sure be nice and appreciated, if you would introduce yourself to the community in the New Member Introduction forum. Folks tend to open up more if they believe they know someone just a little bit. 👍

 

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Drained clutch fluid, cannot build up pressure! bled both ways until nothing but fluid, no air bubbles, still will not disengage or build up pressure! frustrating....
See, this is where you went wrong. Unless you are performing service on the master or slave cylinders, or replacing the lines, you should never drain the fluid. If all you wanted was to replace the fluid, you should use something like a turkey baster to empty the reservoir (careful not to bump the lever!), then refill with fresh. Then pump the new fluid down to the slave and out the bleeder until it runs clear, making sure to close the bleeder before the lever stops moving, and keeping the reservoir topped up.

I know that horse has left the barn, so now you have air trapped, probably in the banjo fitting at the MC. When you strap the lever down, make sure that fitting is lower than the MC, so when you release it (quickly), that air can be drawn back and out the MC. You may have to repeat the operation a few times.
 

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That is a very good tip Rick, I am sure it will save someone heartaches down the line.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
See, this is where you went wrong. Unless you are performing service on the master or slave cylinders, or replacing the lines, you should never drain the fluid. If all you wanted was to replace the fluid, you should use something like a turkey baster to empty the reservoir (careful not to bump the lever!), then refill with fresh. Then pump the new fluid down to the slave and out the bleeder until it runs clear, making sure to close the bleeder before the lever stops moving, and keeping the reservoir topped up.

I know that horse has left the barn, so now you have air trapped, probably in the banjo fitting at the MC. When you strap the lever down, make sure that fitting is lower than the MC, so when you release it (quickly), that air can be drawn back and out the MC. You may have to repeat the operation a few times.
Thanks Rick, I'm not even sure where the banjo fitting is, but I have the MC all the way up on the bars so it's level. I'll try moving it further to see if I can get the hose connection lower than the MC. It appears to be pushing all fluid through the bleeder, but still no pressure. I guess all I can do now is keep pushing it through until I get the air out, wherever it is.
 

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The banjo fitting is that fitting that connects the hose to the MC
 

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They are the round ends on hose #16, between the washers #15; they are hollow, so fluid can flow through holes in the banjo bolts #12 and #13 and into the hose. Because it is hollow, air gets trapped in it at the MC #1. Same is true for the front and rear brakes.

 

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Discussion Starter #11
They are the round ends on hose #16, between the washers #15; they are hollow, so fluid can flow through holes in the banjo bolts #12 and #13 and into the hose. Because it is hollow, air gets trapped in it at the MC #1. Same is true for the front and rear brakes.

Thanks to all, Mine doesn't have any nut like you say. Going to try to back fill through the bleeder valve with syringe?
 

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So what's everybody think, am I wasting my time trying to bleed, or will the air finally come out? I got a vaccum pump, but sure don't want more air to get in...
 

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Take a screwdriver and tap on every part over and over and over. Once air gets in there it can be a real chore to get it out but if you stay at it, it will finally let go. My only reservation is the possibility that there is still a chunk of gelled fluid in there creating yet another obstacle. But tap tap tap and use the vacuum pump. You can also use that pump to back flush. Just empty the reservoir and pump fluid back up to it from the bleeder. But watch the level up there. At some point you will succeed. If you have a vibrating sander you can hold it against the hard parts as well to help dislodge the bubble. Good luck.(y)
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Take a screwdriver and tap on every part over and over and over. Once air gets in there it can be a real chore to get it out but if you stay at it, it will finally let go. My only reservation is the possibility that there is still a chunk of gelled fluid in there creating yet another obstacle. But tap tap tap and use the vacuum pump. You can also use that pump to back flush. Just empty the reservoir and pump fluid back up to it from the bleeder. But watch the level up there. At some point you will succeed. If you have a vibrating sander you can hold it against the hard parts as well to help dislodge the bubble. Good luck.(y)
Thank you Cowboy, I've been hesitant to use the vacuum pump, but have had enough seemingly pointless bleeding. And by the way, I'm 61 and started working on engines and mini bikes, then my flat tracking days, back total close to 50 years. Just haven't had a bike for the last 16 and somehow forgot about draining the fluid! Maybe it was that second x-wife!!:) lol
 

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I almost forgot, when I tighten the bleeder screw, it appears as if the fluid is drawing back up the hose a little, then it stops. Got me wondering if at some point I should take it out and check to see if it's seating all the way, or just replace it.
 

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I almost forgot, when I tighten the bleeder screw, it appears as if the fluid is drawing back up the hose a little, then it stops. Got me wondering if at some point I should take it out and check to see if it's seating all the way, or just replace it.
Well, there are things called speed bleeders, which have a spring-load check valve. I don't use them, but many do. I just make sure I close the bleeder before the lever stops moving, to prevent air being sucked in.

If you have pull-back bars, you may need to loosen the screws that hold the reservoir to them, and slide it over the curve so the banjo fitting is lower than the rest. This allows air at the top to be pulled out through the MC vents at the bottom of the reservoir.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Well, there are things called speed bleeders, which have a spring-load check valve. I don't use them, but many do. I just make sure I close the bleeder before the lever stops moving, to prevent air being sucked in.

If you have pull-back bars, you may need to loosen the screws that hold the reservoir to them, and slide it over the curve so the banjo fitting is lower than the rest. This allows air at the top to be pulled out through the MC vents at the bottom of the reservoir.
Thanks, I'm trying a blend of all these things, now using the vacuum pump, and getting a lot of air out. Hope to finish this afternoon.
 

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Thanks, I'm trying a blend of all these things, now using the vacuum pump, and getting a lot of air out. Hope to finish this afternoon.
Got fingers crossed for ya.
 
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