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I'm MaryLoisRebel
I have started a new adventure in my life. I could call it a mid-life creases but I'm 62 years young, already had my midlife creases, This forum is where I would like to find others to communicate with about motorcycles and this life adventure. A new community for me, ya!
I bought a 2005 Honda Rebel 250 CMX250c with 523 miles on it. (It was in storage for 10 years). I've always wanted to have my own bike. When I seat on it and held the handlebars in my hands for the first time it just felt right, we were a team. I knew to make sure every thing worked properly before turning that motor over. Knowing my Rebel inside and out before our first ride is important to me. Working on this baby is going to make us a better team.
I've never worked on a bike and have little mechanical experience. As grandma I cook, sew and teach food preservation. I knew what tools these things need. For this adventure I need new tools. Guess what, the tool pouch was still in it, never used. Good enough to start with those and several cans of lube. I have a friend who is supervising, and providing me with direction, were to start and oh ya some extra muscle when I can't loosen something.
First step cleaned and rebuild the carburetor,(using YouTube video) it look liked tar inside, While the parts socked I checked out the electrical connection. Removing all bugs and cobwebs. Making sure that the connections where sound and tight. Then I put the carburetor back together. I was thrilled when I sat on the seat, put the ignition key in, turn it on, the ideal light came on. I was reminded to turn the gas on. One hand was on the break, and one on the choke. Here we go. I brought the choke down, I pushed the starter and Rebel needed a couple of times to be reminded of what it felt like to turn over. Then it happened. A little spark of joy filled my being as I seat there enjoying the sound and the feel off this 250cc coming back to life. I let go of the break,( Had been reminded the bike was in neutral and not going any where). Then I started playing with the throttle my friend was checking out the bike. There was something not right with the throttle cable. On further inspection we found water had gotten into the cable housing and rusted the cable causing it to snap. I bought new ones and put them on. Having a little difficult adjusting the throttle control now.
In the mean time I have been able to displace many bugs and there cocoons a whole lot of dirt and dust. Treated the frame to a good cleaning, polishing, treated the seats, and everything to a whole lot of TLC.

I have not taken Rebel on a ride yet, throttle issue still. Need to change break fluid, oil, chain and sprocket and a set of new tires. That's what Rebel 250 needs. This Rebel needs a few things too. A permit.
I sighed up for my safety class in Sept. to get my licence. Behind this woman's brave front is a little girl who has a healthy fear. I have laid a bike down before, learning to ride. My pant leg snagged the foot rest peg as I came to a complete stop in front of my instructor. I bruised my hip. This was during my 1st safety class 15 years ago. The other issue is I'm a bit of a penny pincher. Do I put Rebel on the road for a few months or wait for next season. ( I live in upstate NY, not riding in the snow and ice). The Rebel in me says go for it! I'll let you all know what happens.
 

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Welcome -- sounds like you already know your bike better than many who have 10K miles on them... other than MSF course many years ago, I have little experience with a Rebel, but they are a full bike that is for sure -- and a nice cross between a learning bike and one you can putt around locally for years to come; just enough power to actually go somewhere, but not enough to be a handful...

Good luck with the course next month...

-- Larry
 

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Welcome from No. Va.! Sounds like you have started on a wonderful, lifelong adventure!
 

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This is just outstanding!
And you are an inspiration.

There are still pioneers in this world.
People that step out into the unknown with with a handful of knowledge, a big dream and grit.

Obstacles? Who cares, I'll figure it out.
Fear? Sure, but all things worth doing are frightening.
Self doubt? I'll leave that to the whiners and complainers.

This is true American spirit.
Thank you for posting your story.
It makes me want to embrace life bigger today.
 

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WELCOME ABOARD, and...



We are friendly here. Well, some of us:grin:
 

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The other issue is I'm a bit of a penny pincher. Do I put Rebel on the road for a few months or wait for next season. ( I live in upstate NY, not riding in the snow and ice). The Rebel in me says go for it! I'll let you all know what happens.
First off: welcome. It's never too late to get into riding.

Second: don't wait. Do it now. We are NOT promised tomorrow.
 

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Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
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Go for it, and welcome to the forum
 

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Gidday from a small Island in the Salish Sea.
Remember your self preservation now, and have fun. Some of us here, actually quite a few, are older than you.

UK
 

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I turned 57 on August 24th. I just got my permit last month.
I'll give you the same advice that was given to me. Find a deserted parking lot and ride figure eights going in smaller and tighter turns gradually. If you can find something in that parking lot that you can imagine is a stop sign. Then do a hard right turn as if you're going into the nearest Lane when turning. That really increased my confidence a lot.
Now I am having the time of my life.
The only prior bike experience was going on a 600-mile ride, as passenger on a Honda 900, in the 1980s, in Spain, when I was stationed there. The main thing I remember about that trip is that I could not hardly stand up during rest breaks. My knees hurt so bad. The passenger pegs were too far back for me to get comfortable on them.
Before I got my permit I had to take an actual skills driving test to get my license back. I could not get one for over 11 years until my seizures stopped about three years ago. They started after suffering a TBI in an auto accident around 11 - 12 years ago. I took my test after getting cleared medically in July. The permit test only has 25 questions, I believe, but my memory is not that great. I do remember that the questions were very easy for me. Most of it was just plain common sense. And remember you can retake it the next day if you fail. And you can review the test before exiting the program. so for most people it would not be hard to remember the questions that they missed.
I hope you have a good time and welcome to the forum!
 

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Congratulations on becoming a rider! Those little Rebels have a good reputation as reliable machines, and were in production for many years. Honda revamped the the Rebel recently, they still offer a Rebel, but it's a whole new bike and they added a 500.

I'm impressed with how you jumped right into the mechanics of your machine. With that attitude, you can have confidence in your ability to solve whatever mechanical issue might turn up, but with such low miles, and being a Honda, I'd expect you will have excellent luck with that bike. In my experience, besides the carbs gumming up, the other thing that can go bad because of age alone, is rubber parts. The tubular rubber conduit between the carbs and the engine is particularly suspect in an older bike. Small cracks there, can result in a lean mixture and peculiar engine behavior.

I always recommend installation of an engine guard. I used to say crash bar, but that is considered a faux pas in some circles. It may be there to protect the engine, if it also protects YOU, that's fine too. We older riders have to be a bit more careful, since our bones can be more fragile and it can take us longer to heal.

An engine guard will support the bike if and when you go down keeping the weight of the bike off your leg, and also protecting the more expensive and essential bits of the machine. Guards are generally straightforward to bolt onto the frame and not expensive. The one I bolted onto my RE C5, (you can see a picture in "My Garage", cost me a bit less than $60.

Again, welcome and have fun with your new Rebel.
 

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MaryLoisRebel , mature people rock! Ride safe, but I'd say go for it and ride this fall. But you know the weather in that part of the world. Be ready to take advantage of the MSF find tuning your skills when you get a chance to take the course again. I went with a bigger, badder bike this year and have been thinking about taking the MSF class as a refresher. I'm sure it would do me some good.

I'm not a mechanically inclined person - and I can prove it - so I am in awe of your jumping in and doing things like rebuilding carbs. More power to you!

Ride safe and have fun.
 
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