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Anybody watch? I saw some of the time trials and a short clip of M. Marquez making a ridiculous save in a gravel trap. Was trying to avoid the results until I could watch the race online, but my local paper had an e-headline and I glanced and saw it. 馃が I'll watch, regardless, but definitely sucks the excitement out of it...
 

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Great race, but haven't heard the condition of Marquez other than of course zero points!
 

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I know he broke his arm and there was concern about nerve damage. Never realized how much fans either love him or hate him, but it was nice to see everyone saying they hoped he recovered.
 

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Yes, after the gravel pit save he went from last to fighting for second I believe and highsided with just a few laps left.
 

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Although winning a race is all about the greed, Marquez first lost 25, then gained 16 back to again lose them all. It's not a single race that wins the championship, but I'm sure he will be back in the running soon, if his injury doesn't keep him out.
 

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Anyone care to write several chapters on why Fabio goes faster. Probably has nothing to do with counter steering. I would need to be at the track to see what he may be doing differently. Notice also the fastest bikes do not necessarily win. 93 may have crashed times two, pushing a bit too hard. UK
 

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Greed some may call the practice of racing. Others might call it the art.
I wouldn't call it art, but would not disagree that others may, and if they do I would support that they have an opinion.
 

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I dunno George. It's different things at different times. To me anyway. Sometimes, going for the win, especially if it gets heated, it can get physical and bring out what could be called a greed thing.
You sure aren't giving anything away if you can help it.

But, there are times, when everything is clicking, that it does become a kind of art. You know the guys you are up against, you know as long as you hit your marks and don't make any mistakes, you are gonna win. Like applying the paint to the canvas, as long as the technique is there, with not a lot of errors, bike and brush become kind of the same. There is nothing greedy about it.

Winning. As a pretty good B rider, I had my share. But, to me, winning can be a lonely thing.
 

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Where your brain is when running with the fast guys, can only be explained by the guys, that have run with the fast guys.
But most often the kids who have watched a video or two, know more about it. UK
 

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Winning. As a pretty good B rider, I had my share. But, to me, winning can be a lonely thing.
I think between our comments and terms it is more semantics. Individuals may respond to different views depending on their personal perspectives which are often weighted by their previous personal experience. So I can appreciate that your approach is to view it at times as an art form. It's certainly more than I can do.
 

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Motogrady said:
Winning. As a pretty good B rider, I had my share. But, to me, winning can be a lonely thing.
Eagle Six said:
I think between our comments and terms it is more semantics. Individuals may respond to different views depending on their personal perspectives which are often weighted by their previous personal experience. So I can appreciate that your approach is to view it at times as an art form. It's certainly more than I can do.
Would it all depend on the circle of contacts you keep. Like good friends would stick with you thru thick and thin. Or maybe it depends on how you got that win. Yep, I could then see how it might get lonely.
 

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I dunno guys. How can I put it. My experience, at the races might not be like most.

When you are in the midst of it, say running mid pack, you are one of the guys. You pass riders, they get you back, you mess up, they mess up, everyone scares the heck out of themselves a time or 2.

It's almost like a mini boot camp. It's something that is often shared afterwards, items, experiences, between those that were in it. "Man, you got me on that downhill.......I thought you bought the farm on that big double.....if I knew you were that close I woulda hugged that hairpin!"

Camaraderie at times runs very deep.

But, when you win, it's different. There is only one winner. Nobody likes having their shortcomings rubbed in their face. It can be like, yeah, you won, you don't have tell me how you stuffed me on the last lap. Nobody likes a braggart.

So, at times, unless you are a somewhat self centered, somewhat arrogant individual, you don't really want to rub winning, or how you won that race in general, in the other guys faces.
So, you kind of shut up, be gracious, be humble, enjoy the win, by yourself.

I know, it sounds weird, I wish I could express some things in a better way, but at times, it can be lonely at the top.
 

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When you run with the fast guys it is a different story. Way to go. You also learn that some days are better than others. UK
 

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I know, it sounds weird, I wish I could express some things in a better way, but at times, it can be lonely at the top.
I think you expressed it well. Competition effects different folks different ways. For some it's pretty much a surface experience, for others it may run deeper and mean much more. Winning is a means to the end. Some see it as the only prize, while others may see it as verification of the path followed to get their. Perhaps you feel more inside than others, perhaps your love for the race is as strong as your desire for the win. Perhaps when you win that lonely feeling is what a lot of other winners feel, it's just different because there is only one winner and a lot of losers. The losers all have something in common, they lost. A winner is the only one that can share that feeling with themselves. The lonely feelings may be more common among those that have more feelings and enjoyment from the game than others. They say the loneliest place is at the top.
 

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Heys guys how about a recap of last weekend?

Round 3, which I think used to be held behind the old Iron Curtain, I'm not sure, history buffs correct me if I'm wrong, had a complete look from round 1 and 2.

First off, KTM got their first Motogp win!
And the guy that did it, did it in his 3rd race in Motogp!

The Frenchman at Yamaha, who looked unbeatable in the first 2 races, struggled to not finish last.

Ducati saved face by having one of their satellite team riders hit the box, on a last years bike.

Honda, jeepers, talk about looking like a one dimensional outfit without Mark Marquez.
Alex finishes in last place, points wise, and the replacement rider for mm crashes out.
Repsol walks away from this GP with one, that's right, one point.

This weekend, Austria. And with MM sitting out with a broken arm, it looks like it's anyone's to win.

A better recap, here..... Czech Republic MotoGP: The Winners & Losers
 

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Morbideli has a nice smooth progression. His best finish so far. Previous was fifth. I like this kind of steady progression as it shows learning along the way. Some guys are gifted like Zarco, and run at the front, and fade. Fabio may do the same. Valentino is the main sponsor of Franco. Jack Miller skipped moto2 and went from moto to the big leagues. He is unreliable IMO. He almost won moto1 but crashed there as well. Valentino may not quite have it to run with the fastest guys on any given day. It happens when you are 30, let alone 41. IOM riders are still competitive past 40 because they remember the track, and that takes about 5 years at least.
I was chatting with Alan about this last Sunday. Alan was a good expert rider. He also ran against a couple of gifted guys like dearly departed Jim Dunn and Steve Baker, and of course, me. He had a couple of years more experience than me at the time. For the weekend warriors, it takes about five ears to be able to run with the fast guys, and another three at least to be competitive with them. That is why the gifted guys in MotoGP are at least 21, and have been racing for about 5 years minimum. And that is on the world stage, plus whatever they do on their home circuits. UK
 

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Morbideli has a nice smooth progression. His best finish so far. Previous was fifth. I like this kind of steady progression as it shows learning along the way. Some guys are gifted like Zarco, and run at the front, and fade. Fabio may do the same. Valentino is the main sponsor of Franco. Jack Miller skipped moto2 and went from moto to the big leagues. He is unreliable IMO. He almost won moto1 but crashed there as well. Valentino may not quite have it to run with the fastest guys on any given day. It happens when you are 30, let alone 41. IOM riders are still competitive past 40 because they remember the track, and that takes about 5 years at least.
I was chatting with Alan about this last Sunday. Alan was a good expert rider. He also ran against a couple of gifted guys like dearly departed Jim Dunn and Steve Baker, and of course, me. He had a couple of years more experience than me at the time. For the weekend warriors, it takes about five ears to be able to run with the fast guys, and another three at least to be competitive with them. That is why the gifted guys in MotoGP are at least 21, and have been racing for about 5 years minimum. And that is on the world stage, plus whatever they do on their home circuits. UK
I tell ya. the most amazing thing to me, is 46 apparently WANTS to do it.
I mean, most guys, 3, 4 , 5 years at it, just when you're getting good, are burnt out on it.
It's a job.
Effin Rossi, the energizer bunny.

I dunno Krusty. As far as the heir apparent, after MM, I'm leaning towards Quartararo.
Fast qualifier all last year, kinda putting it together flag to flag this year, he settles in, he's dangerous.
 

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K then. Lets check back at the end of the year. Fabio has a head start. Franco had an engine blow up. A long shot for me, but my money is on Franco. I quit the paved tracks when I was almost thirty. It was costing too much, and I was inland 250 miles from the closest tracks. I started riding in cross country races. Lots to learn, hard on the body, but much cheaper and local, as in within about 75 miles for several events. I do think you made a good choice.
Maybe I will chat with Alan again. Gifted versus steady improvement. Alan is 80 and the kids can not keep up with him on winding roads. UK
 
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