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Motorbike Macgyver
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’ve replaced the cable, basket, pressure plate, clutch center, clutch nut, brand new EBC friction plates, original springs, steel plates, clutch lifter and clutch lever. The clutch is still really hard to pull and I’m getting very frustrated as I’ve got two bikes I can’t ride right now. Can anyone help?
 

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CB125R 2018 (CBF125NA European)
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Just spitting ideas right now.
  • Is the clutch cable housing in good condition everywhere?
    • Not clogged?
    • Not ripped?
    • Lubricated on the inside?
  • Correct oil in the clutch?
    • Not too viscous?
    • No dirt anywhere?
  • I can see in the clutch diagram there's a needle bearing. Is it in good condition?
    • 91001-147-003
  • No screws or bolts that have been tightened too much?
Sincerely hope you can find the issue.
 

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No screws or bolts that have been tightened too much
(y) highest probability.
When you pull on the lever that compresses the springs in the clutch. If the springs are already compressed then it will be super tight at the lever. Did you over-tighten the nuts that compress the springs?
 

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Motorbike Macgyver
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
M
(y) highest probability.
When you pull on the lever that compresses the springs in the clutch. If the springs are already compressed then it will be super tight at the lever. Did you over-tighten the nuts that compress the springs?
I’m honestly not sure. The repair manual said snug them up and torque them to 9 lbs but I didn’t use a torque wrench, I tightened them until they bottomed out and then just a tiny bit past that
 

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M

I’m honestly not sure. The repair manual said snug them up and torque them to 9 lbs but I didn’t use a torque wrench, I tightened them until they bottomed out and then just a tiny bit past that
Any chance the clutch steels and plates are the wrong thickness, or you put in one too many? Compare the old stack to the new one in height, is it similar (minus some wear on the old ones)?
Why did you change the clutch to begin with, what was the original problem?
This is probably one simple issue that you just need to find.
 

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Motorbike Macgyver
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Any chance the clutch steels and plates are the wrong thickness, or you put in one too many? Compare the old stack to the new one in height, is it similar (minus some wear on the old ones)?
Why did you change the clutch to begin with, what was the original problem?
This is probably one simple issue that you just need to find.
The old basket and center had grooves worn into them. The clutch was very tight and wouldn’t shift into neutral. The new friction plates came in a pack of six, there are six friction plates and six steel plates in the clutch pack. No real way to screw it up if you followed the manual correctly, which I believe I did mention using a repair manual in my OP. I did not replace the steel plates, I just scuffed them up with a sanding block since they had been worn pretty smooth.
 

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M

I’m honestly not sure. The repair manual said snug them up and torque them to 9 lbs but I didn’t use a torque wrench, I tightened them until they bottomed out and then just a tiny bit past that
So would you say that the springs right now are coil bound ?
... that would be a problem, you can't compress coil springs that are already completely compressed.
 

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Motorbike Macgyver
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
So would you say that the springs right now are coil bound ?
... that would be a problem, you can't compress coil springs that are already completely compressed.
I guess that could be a possibility. This is the first time I’ve done any work on a clutch, I thought I was following the manual correctly. Watched a video of a guy doing the clutch on a Honda rebel, looks like the same clutch as mine and he was using a drill to tighten the spring bolts, and I’ve been googling how to tighten clutch springs all morning and a lot of people say to basically do it the way I did but maybe I need to back them off a bit and see what happens.
 

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Motorbike Macgyver
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
So would you say that the springs right now are coil bound ?
... that would be a problem, you can't compress coil springs that are already completely compressed.
Would you say I should tighten them until they just bottom out and no more? The reason I didn’t use a torque wrench is because I tried and my torque wrench doesn’t even click at that low of a setting. So I figured just past snug would be good.
 

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We can only tell you what to look for from a thousand miles away (y)
& photos always help if you can post good ones. There are many variations on clutch designs but they all perform the same basic function, there has to be movement in the springs when you pull in the lever.

... your torque wrench is too big you have one that is for cars, get a little 1/4 inch drive one.
 

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Motorbike Macgyver
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
We can only tell you what to look for from a thousand miles away (y)
& photos always help if you can post good ones. There are many variations on clutch designs but they all perform the same basic function, there has to be movement in the springs when you pull in the lever.

... your torque wrench is too big you have one that is for cars, get a little 1/4 inch drive one.
here’s a video of the Honda rebel clutch, Looks like same clutch as mine. Im at work so can’t take a pic of mine right now and don’t even know how to tell if the springs are fully compressed as once they’re tightened you can’t even see them as they sit behind the lifter but the video will give you an idea.
 

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You're right, that's pretty simple. You should almost be able to pry the outside plate away from the clutch basket with a couple of screwdrivers and mimic the movement of the clutch cable without removing anything.
After he removed the springs the clutch spun freely by the large nut, hopefully yours does too.
 

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Motorbike Macgyver
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
You're right, that's pretty simple. You should almost be able to pry the outside plate away from the clutch basket with a couple of screwdrivers and mimic the movement of the clutch cable without removing anything.
After he removed the springs the clutch spun freely by the large nut, hopefully yours does too.
I’m not quite sure what you mean by that, can you elaborate a bit?
 

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I’m not quite sure what you mean by that, can you elaborate a bit?
He means putting a couple screwdrivers between the outside plate and the basket, and using them as "levers" to pull away the outside plate from the basket, against the pressure of the springs. Basically performing the same job as your clutch cable, but this way, you'll be able to check spring tightness without having to disassemble anything. Clever, but use sturdy screwdrivers.;)
 

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Motorbike Macgyver
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
He means putting a couple screwdrivers between the outside plate and the basket, and using them as "levers" to pull away the outside plate from the basket, against the pressure of the springs. Basically performing the same job as your clutch cable, but this way, you'll be able to check spring tightness without having to disassemble anything. Clever, but use sturdy screwdrivers.;)
By outside plate, do you mean the clutch lifter plate, the outermost steel plate, the clutch center?
 

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By outside plate, do you mean the clutch lifter plate, the outermost steel plate, the clutch center?
The complex shaped one that has the springs push up against it and it moves. It's the only one that should move away from the clutch basket itself. ... don't damage it trying, it should not take much force to move those 4 light springs.
 

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Motorbike Macgyver
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
The complex shaped one that has the springs push up against it and it moves. It's the only one that should move away from the clutch basket itself. ... don't damage it trying, it should not take much force to move those 4 light springs.
But the clutch thruster plate moves the lifter plate towards the pressure plate, not away from it.
 

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Motorbike Macgyver
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
We can only tell you what to look for from a thousand miles away (y)
& photos always help if you can post good ones. There are many variations on clutch designs but they all perform the same basic function, there has to be movement in the springs when you pull in the lever.

... your torque wrench is too big you have one that is for cars, get a little 1/4 inch drive one.
I just went to Home Depot and got a pretty nice inch pound torque wrench, it goes from 30-200 inch pounds so I can do the conversion. I’ll loosen the springs tonight and torque them to the proper spec.
 

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Once you loosen it all off you will see how it can be done. The wrench will pay for itself in bolts that you don't break.


... I had to replace a chain tensioner spring just now and the 20$ replacement springs fit poorly. I'm going the need to engineer up something better then original on that one. lol I might need to try home depot for that too.
 

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Motorbike Macgyver
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Once you loosen it all off you will see how it can be done. The wrench will pay for itself in bolts that you don't break.


... I had to replace a chain tensioner spring just now and the 20$ replacement springs fit poorly. I'm going the need to engineer up something better then original on that one. lol I might need to try home depot for that too.
Well, I just torqued them to the proper spec and it’s still ******* tight I just don’t get it
 
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