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Discussion Starter #1
Hello, looking at a 1987 Yamaha FZ700 one year tariff buster bike. What is it worth in excellent condition? Any opinions? I know what blue book states, but this is a one year bike and probably not many made. Somebody said they thought only 500 were made for the usa. There were also Canadian models. Any info would be much appreciated!
 

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There was a Federal law to keep CHEAP Japanese bikes from being imported into the United States because Harley Davidson proved that the JAPS were flooding our markets with numbers and prices that no one could compete with. I believe it was called "Dumping." It was proved that the Japanese government was involved with the pricing and taxation strategy.

The Import tax was raised substantially on any bikes of 700cc's or more.

The JAPS being shrewd just started building high performance 700cc bikes that were faster and more feature packed than the usual 750's.

http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=...C2BWnmNtAGRu9s3wQ&sig2=95QfxcTHHCuT2BYAtaiVxQ

http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=...9uH_fNy2Fzs8dS9xw&sig2=3WN2mg9-FIpIE97khDrM_Q

Today, as I type this, there are still many, many countries that protect their own industries by charging outrageous taxes against other countries to keep their products out and their own people working. I will take this policy anyday for the United States. Bring our jobs back to this country now!

Political rant is over:biggrin:

That FZ700 sure isn't worth much now, after all these years but they were a good bike. How much?????

Sam:coffeescreen:
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I know the 1984 Honda VF1000F Interceptor was a tariff bike too, and those sell for a lot of money.
 

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There was a Federal law to keep CHEAP Japanese bikes from being imported into the United States because Harley Davidson proved that the JAPS were flooding our markets with numbers and prices that no one could compete with. I believe it was called "Dumping." It was proved that the Japanese government was involved with the pricing and taxation strategy.

The Import tax was raised substantially on any bikes of 700cc's or more.

The JAPS being shrewd just started building high performance 700cc bikes that were faster and more feature packed than the usual 750's.

http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=...C2BWnmNtAGRu9s3wQ&sig2=95QfxcTHHCuT2BYAtaiVxQ

http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=...9uH_fNy2Fzs8dS9xw&sig2=3WN2mg9-FIpIE97khDrM_Q

Today, as I type this, there are still many, many countries that protect their own industries by charging outrageous taxes against other countries to keep their products out and their own people working. I will take this policy anyday for the United States. Bring our jobs back to this country now!

Political rant is over:biggrin:

That FZ700 sure isn't worth much now, after all these years but they were a good bike. How much?????

Sam:coffeescreen:


He wants $2200.00. was asking $2600.00
 

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There was a Federal law to keep CHEAP Japanese bikes from being imported into the United States because Harley Davidson proved that the JAPS were flooding our markets with numbers and prices that no one could compete with. I believe it was called "Dumping." It was proved that the Japanese government was involved with the pricing and taxation strategy.

The Import tax was raised substantially on any bikes of 700cc's or more.

The JAPS being shrewd just started building high performance 700cc bikes that were faster and more feature packed than the usual 750's.

Today, as I type this, there are still many, many countries that protect their own industries by charging outrageous taxes against other countries to keep their products out and their own people working. I will take this policy anyday for the United States. Bring our jobs back to this country now!
In the early 1980s, Harley Davidson was manufacturing total s**t and charging an exorbitant price. Naturally, the True Believers still bought them, no matter how much they had to pay for their oil-leaking junk. But the vast majority of the market went to the Japanese because, unlike HD, they had actually learned something about manufacturing quality and efficiency in the years after WWII.

However, about that time the US motorcycle market collapsed in the 1981-82 recession, and the Japanese mfrs were left with huge inventories. This was sold at deeply discounted prices over several years. Even in 1983, the magazines had full page ads for unsold 1981 models. This wasn't a diabolical plan, it was excessive optimism and poor planning. And at the time no one seriously believed that $2500 Japanese psuedo-cruisers were stealing market share from Harley.

It was in this market collapse that Harley management saw an opportunity and bought the company from then-owner AMF. Because they were hardly in a position to build competitive products immediately, they persuaded Congress to protect them until they could get on their feet. What they got is a tariff on bikes > 700cc that were made outside the US (with maybe an exception for lower volume mfrs like BMW).

The Japanese responded by building 700cc bikes and by investing in US manufacturing operations (Kawasaki in Nebraska, Honda in Ohio).

Harley, of course, went on to great success, though they could have done it without persuading the federal government to punish buyers of Japanese bikes. When the tariff ended--early--HD hadn't yet overcome their tendency to whine like little girls. They complained that the Japanese had gamed the tariff by downsizing existing models from 750cc to 700cc. Apparently they misunderstood the engineering flexibility of their competitors, who simply designed a new crankshaft and badges, and lost very little performance. And they complained about the hundreds of millions of dollars their competitors invested in America. You see, those thousands of Americans who got jobs weren't of any interest to Harley, no matter what they had told Congress. What they wanted with the tariff was not to employ Americans but to muscle competitors off their corner.

Harley nearly died 30 years ago BECAUSE they had survived for decades without competition, foreign or domestic, and failed to adapt to the postwar era. They thrive today BECAUSE foreign competition forced them into the 21st century.
 

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Let's all stand up and cheer for the Japanese.

Let's all stand up and cheer for Harley Davidson.

Let's all stand up and cheer that we aren't speaking Japanese right now or German or Italian---hey wait, those are some of the most profitable companies in the world. Thank God that Mexico doesn't try to get into our motorcycle market. (I forgot, they have no workers down there anymore;)) India is making huge inroads as are the Chinese.

Me, I'll take our craftsmen any time. I am not a globalist.

PS: There are more of those AMF "crap years" harleys around and worth 10 times more than their Japanese counterparts--clean or not.

I have no Harley Stock and at this time, I don't own a Harley but I've had 3 and they were superb---especially when we Harley people give each other the "Top secret wave:biggrin:"

God bless America!

Sam:coffeescreen:
 

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He wants $2200.00 was asking $2600.00.

You got a picture? That seems pretty steep to me, but I don't want one.

Everything is worth what you can get someone to pay for it.

If your buying it to ride, and you like it, buy it.
If you are buying for an investment, well...

For me old and "rare" means hard to find parts for.

Unless it happens to come from across the other pond.
But then again they are still hard to find parts for. :p
 

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Discussion Starter #10
You got a picture? That seems pretty steep to me, but I don't want one.

Everything is worth what you can get someone to pay for it.

If your buying it to ride, and you like it, buy it.
If you are buying for an investment, well...

For me old and "rare" means hard to find parts for.

Unless it happens to come from across the other pond.
But then again they are still hard to find parts for. :p[/QUO

This is part of a review:

What really made the engine in this bike different than the competition was its five-valve “Genesis” design. Yamaha used five valves per cylinder (three intake, two exhaust) to try to maximize the amount of air they could pack into the engine by going a step beyond the now commonplace four-valve designs. This really put Yamaha on the cutting edge of engine design; to date, the only other mass-produced five-valve engines I can think of are the VW-Audi offerings from about 1998 forward.
 

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Multiple valves, up to 4 or 5 have been around forever and heres' an interesting link:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multi-valve#Before_1914

The downside to such large overall valve area is much less torque in the lower rpm ranges but they are superb from mid-range up.

Ever wonder why so many engines still use 2 valve cylinder heads? Harley riders for the most part want torque that makes the bikes so pleasurable and easy to ride without having to keep the rpm's up all of the time or not even having to downshift to pass. Goldwing's have always had only 2 valve heads as had 99% of our small and big block, world dominating or workhorse car and truck engines.

I can imagine how time consuming it would be to adjust the valves on that Fazer. 20 screw and locknuts or 20 shim over bucket or 20 shims under the bucket will be a tough one. The only good part at least with Yamaha is the 26,500 mile adjustment intervals. I can't imagine what a "Valve job" would cost:biggrin:

Sam:coffeescreen:
 

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I owned one about 10 years ago. Payed $2500. for it at the time.
It was a VERY quick little bike, but the handle bar vibration was terrible. I only ever took it on short rides because of the terrible vibration. On the plus side, I sold it 2 years later for exactly what I paid for it.
 

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Harley, of course, went on to great success, though they could have done it without persuading the federal government to punish buyers of Japanese bikes. When the tariff ended--early--HD hadn't yet overcome their tendency to whine like little girls. They complained that the Japanese had gamed the tariff by downsizing existing models from 750cc to 700cc.

Harley nearly died 30 years ago BECAUSE they had survived for decades without competition, foreign or domestic, and failed to adapt to the postwar era. They thrive today BECAUSE foreign competition forced them into the 21st century.
Harley went to the government and asked them to repeal the tariff early.:)

I can't think of any time in it's history that Harley didn't face competition, either domestic or foreign, and that competition fueled many of their design changes. The Sportster in 1957, for one example.
 

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"PS: There are more of those AMF "crap years" harleys around and worth 10 times more than their Japanese counterparts--clean or not."

True enough.

And as for them leaking oil, I guess the guy doesn't know they had automatic chain oilers, huh? :coffeescreen:
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Harley's have Japanese, Chinese, austrailian parts on them. Japanese rims since the 70s I believe. That is why true Harley owner's like myself take them apart and replace the foreign parts with American made parts to make it a true American made machine.
 

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And parts from England, Ireland, Germany, Italy, Brazil, Spain, and others. About 12 to 17% of the parts, depending on the model, for these American made machines originate overseas. (Except for the models made in India, which have 83 to 88% of their parts made in the USA!)

The OEM wheel rims were never made in Japan. Many of the cast ones are now made in Australia, and about half of the steel ones are made in Italy, with the rest made in the USA.
 
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