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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, I've recently come into the ownership of a 1986 Suzuki Intruder 700 with only 3,500 miles on it, only trick is it hasn't run in 23 years.

So there is the bad news or atleast all I can find, it hasn't run in 23 years and has sat perfectly still that whole time.

On to the good news, this bike was stored in a humid garage and under blankets. The seat and leather all looks brand new and is soft and smooth. The brake line and hydraulic clutch line are nice and squishy they aren't stiff and the rubber moves around freely. Same goes for the rubber around the carburetors nice and squishy not stiff or swollen and no signs of dry rot (atleast on the ones I could reach without disassembling something). When the bike was put away the battery was taken out of it and the tank (maybe the carbs too I'm not sure) was drained of fuel.

So, good rubbers (tires don't even look bad although I know I should replace them) empty tank (mostly atleast, I smell some varnish in there) and it was running perfectly when it was parked so there shouldn't be anything wrong with it. My question now becomes what should I do to get it back on the road. I've been reading post like this on sites for a few months now but I wanted to use this to give you my own personal situation and also as a way of documenting things.

I should have a chance to start working on it in around two weeks and would like to have a game plan to go off of by then. I found a copy of the shop manual online so unless I run into a problem or prove to be incompetent I should be able to find out how to disassemble anything I need to.

Here's what I know so far from just using my hands to mess with things

1 the clutch and brake lines are empty and the levers don't do anything when pulled in (obviously because they are empty) however I asked and they were never drained so possibly a leak but the brake fluid reservoir has a little bit sitting in the line so maybe a leak but if so why is that fluid still there?
2 the carbs wouldn't open until a little elbow grease was thrown in there. The rear carb seems to open and close on its own by hand however the actual throttle won't come back because the front carb won't shut on it's own (and is almost impossible to close by hand) and feels slimy to open.
3 I have sat on the bike and tried to walk it around but the front wheel will stop after a few inches and feels gummy the whole time. the rear wheel seems to move fine when in neutral but I can't say for sure because the front wheel makes it so hard to move (so hard that I almost can't walk it unless someone is pushing it).
4 the bike will shift down into first and neutral and then into second comfortably and pretty smoothly so I'm not worried about that.
5 after sitting for so long untouched there isn't any rust that I can find anywhere although there is a very minor amount of pitting on the handlebars. Though I still have the great fear that the engine may have seized from sitting for so long.

I shouldn't be too mechanically incompetent as I know my way around a car pretty well however bikes are a new field for me and while I have my license I've never owned one before, simply ridden some of my friends.

I went ahead and ordered two carb rebuild kits that should be here by the time I get to the bike, I'm not unfamiliar with those as I helped my dad get a 77 Honda ct70 running awhile back and have since kept up with its maintenance (just fiddling with the carb cause it's never run right) will I need a new air filter? Because I know it's original and the one off the Honda practically dissolved to the touch and I certainly don't want that getting into the engine.

I have a general idea of what to do from reading all of the other restoration forums I could find that were relevant but would like to make sure I didn't miss anything in my reading and also that I have a place to cry if something goes horribly wrong.

Phew* I hope that was enough information but if you need anymore let me know and I'll tell you what I can find out. I'll be away from the bike until early May and then I can dig in. Thanks in advance you guys every comment is appreciated and I'll try and post some pictures when I get back home in may! Can't wait!

Tl;dr I have a bike that hasn't run in 23 years, how do I start it without breaking it?

Thanks!
 

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I'd first make sure the pistons aren't seized in the cylinders; remove the spark plugs and try to push it in top gear - it should turn the engine over. Alternatively, you can remove the stator cover on the left side and turn the crankshaft there.

Just because the brake and clutch lines feel OK, doesn't mean that they are - replace them; I like the Teflon-lined stainless wrapped version, like the ones from Galfer or Motion Pro.

Brake fluid will evaporate, given time; I suspect you will have to open the slave cylinders and clean out the jelly that has formed in there - you can do this when you replace the lines. Also, check the little holes in the bottom of both reservoirs, as they are probably plugged, too.

Yes, new air filters. If you plan to clean the carbs, they come off the bike as a unit, because there is a cable and hose that joins them, and starting over with the idle sync cable can be a PITA.
 

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23 Y/O brake lines? still shiny? awesome *snap* just because the outside looks good doesn't mean that the fluid has not lost it's luster and ruined the inside of the cables. Before really getting it out there, do a full tune-up. put the battery on a tender and set it to 6 amps this will either a. make the possible dead cell dead or b. prove that the battery is fine. As far as fuel goes, I would put a full tank of 100 octane in it and some fuel injector cleaner. If you do not wish to replace the tires, find a place that can fill them with nitrous. just bring a screwdriver and empty them of the air before you start filling but that's just a suggestion. the cold-ness of the nitrous will keep them from getting too hot on the road and bringing out possible inner dry rot.
 

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I thought that might have been what you meant, but you never know what the latest Internet fad might be encouraging people to put Nitrous Oxide in their tires. Silly, I know, but I've seen a lot of silly $hit on-line. :)

As for nitrogen, there's no real or tangible benefit to put nitrogen in a tire for anyone riding a street bike, even a super hopped up hot one. There's a benefit for those that race on the professional level, but those are the teams that also use stuff like hand-laid tires where one side of the profile is different from the other so the tire will match the intended track. For the rest of us, nitrogen is just another way to separate a rider from the coins in his pocket.:)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I didn't know brake fluid evaporated. By clean out the reservoirs I assume you mean the front brake and the clutch master cylinder? Or do you just mean the place where the fluid is stored?

You guys are right I haven't checked the insides of the line but it can't hurt to replace them.

And a new set of tires is definitely on my list, the bike belonged to my grandpa and I intend to take it to shows just as he used to.
 

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I would find out if the engine turns over before you throw too much money at it. Pull the plugs, maybe put a little light weight oil in the cylinders, let that sit a while and then try to rotate the engine.
 

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I was going to recommend getting the repair manual but it looks like you already got that covered. I agree with Critter, make sure the engine runs before you put a whole lot of money into it. Looking forward to seeing pictures.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Alright, day one of working on the bike a success even though I didn't know where any of the tools were being in an unfamiliar garage. sorry for the wait.

Had a few hours to work on it today and in that time put some mystery oil in the cylinders and got the motor to turn as well as removing the front brake, the side covers, seat, and tank, as well as draining the oil. Don't know how to get the stator cover off unless it's just a big flathead screw and I'm dumber than I thought so I ended up pushing it in second which wasn't smooth but it worked. I'll be back at it tomorrow. And sorry I didn't take any after pictures but here are some before I laid a hand to it!
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Alright so I disassembled the brake calipers but I really don't have expierience in this field, so I'm not sure what's okay and what isn't. There seems to be some pitting on the piston for the inside half of the caliper and I cant get the other piston out from the outside caliper. I'll attach some pics and you guys can let me know if I need to replace the piston and why the other one won't come out. I've been using brake parts cleaner and a towel to get the gunk but what's left on the piston doesn't seem to be coming off. So here's a picture of the piston, the caliper it came out of and then the one I can't get apart. I cleaned the brake reservoir yesterday and got it to pump and took the brake line of to order a new one and Im about to order the carb rebuild kit.

As far as getting a battery goes the one I see is the yuasa fill it yourself battery or whatever it's called and I've no idea how that works and frankly that makes me leary of it.
 

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For some reason ,I thought the older 700's came with cast wheels instead of spokes.
Yuasa batteries are good, only problem is, you'll need a dealer that has acid packs to fill them.
Critter is correct in that you should get it running first before you start all this. Let's hope for the best.
As far as brake work, Soak the seized piston in some sort of penetrant and you'll need some compressed air to get it out. If the other piston looks like the one in the picture, you should be able to reuse, just needs some polishing with some very very fine emory cloth or scotch brite type pad. A dealer should be able to find you seal kits for the calipers as the 800's do share some of the same parts, if not a good auto parts store should be able to find you some. Plan on rebuilding the front mast cylinder.
Twin carbs. right?
You should remove the rear drive and lube the splines on the shaft drive unit that goes into the trans. as they were always a bit skimpy on grease during assembly.
Star-type lockwashers on the battery cables.
 

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Yes, I'd use a Scotch Brite pad, the kind with no soap, and dip it in clear brake fluid to scrub. You may want to wear nitrile gloves for that. You should be able to use a hook to get the seal out, so you can clean the groove it sits in.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
So I'm mostly waiting on parts right now and believe it or not I couldn't find a factory replacement brakeline on the sites you mentioned so if I'm not mistaken my option is to custom order one.

The only things I need to get off still are the two carbs but I've got atleast 1 screw on both of them where the head is stripping and I just can't put any force on them. I've tried spraying plenty of wd-40 on them trying to free them up but they just keep stripping so I'm about to sacrifice a few screwdrivers and JB weld them to the screws to get them out and then just replace the screws. Although if anyone's got a better plan I'm interested. Won't be back on the project for a few days.

I also want to make sure that the clutch cable is essentially the same as the brake cable and that I can order the same kind of cable and it'll do the job.

Other than that are there any special requirements for the fuel lines? I figured I could just take the lines off and bring them to a autoparts store and ask them for the same length and size rubber hose and it would be okay.

Thanks again guys I appreciate the comments
 

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I have an 85, and I have trouble finding parts for basic maintenance. No surprise you are having issues on a 86.

For the stripped out screws, I would consider this:

Ontel Speed Out Speed Out Screw Extractor (4-Piece)-1000264 - The Home Depot

If you follow the directions, it will hold tight enough to break something so careful. Also, you are drilling out the head of the screw, so metal flakes, again, careful.
 
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