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Hello everyone im new to the fourms and have a little problem with my bike I purchased as a winter project its a gs550es 1985 and when I first got it the gas tank had numerous leaks in it so I immediately cleaned the carbs and was bored of sitting around waiting to find a new tank so I tried to start it with one of my quad tanks and it was just flooding the motor anyway now I have a new tank with a clean inside clean fuel filter and functional petcock I put the bike all the way on choke and it fires right up and idles it dies a few times but will idle with choke all the way on for sevral minutes. If I try to touch the gas at all or try to turn the choke of at all it will die. even after idilig with choke on for ten minutes if I try to unchoke it will die. Also I am doing all this with the boots off the carbs and air box. I cant find out how to open the airbox to get a filter in there prying it with a flathead wont open it also is it possible to run a pod filter on these oval carbs and have it run right?
 

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It sounds like a pretty serious lean condition - either carbs still blocked/dirty, or a massive air/vacuum leak. Or, it could simply be airbox and filter aren't hooked up. Or, a combination of the above.

Pods usually take a considerable amount of effort to make functional on a bike - pretty serious jetting issues - CV carbs especially.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It sounds like a pretty serious lean condition - either carbs still blocked/dirty, or a massive air/vacuum leak. Or, it could simply be airbox and filter aren't hooked up. Or, a combination of the above.

Pods usually take a considerable amount of effort to make functional on a bike - pretty serious jetting issues - CV carbs especially.[/QUOTE




Thank you for your response. Where would an air vacuum
leak occur? The intakes look fine I was thinking possibly one of
the I think its the right side choke cable connected to the carb
it connects thru a plastic thread coming of the choke cable and it is stripped
Could it leak thru there?
 

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The most common place is the between the carb and head through the rubber boots. Bad vacuum lines can also cause a leak.
 

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Alright so I got it running hooked the air box back up it ended up being 4 jets were clogged tiny little guys I cleaned them with the high e string of one of my guitars lol anyway it wont run over 4 - 5 grand and im assuming its because theres no air filter in the airbox I wanna buy a k&n Filter but im stumped on how to open the air box? it seems sealed?
 

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try a google search on your make and model for an emanual you can download
 

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before you spend any money...

I'd suggest you clean the carbs again. Correctly this time. Avoid the urge to shove wires and things through jets. They can be damaged and this will affect fuel flow. There are a few ways to clean them. You could use an ultrasonic cleaner. But you have to buy one. I like carb cleaning solutions. Be wary of them, they will change the rubber O-rings in various places in your carbs such that they will swell and not fit or deteriorate and break. USE THEM IN A WELL VENTILATED AREA, LIKE OUTSIDE. The stuff in them is not good for your lungs, eyes, skin, gonads, ears, etc. Keep it off your skin with nitrile gloves available in most auto parts stores. If you like your eyes, were some safety glasses. Resist the urge to drink it. Tempting as it may be, don't.

The carbs are probably in a rack so pulling them apart and soaking them individually may be more than you want to bite off, but that would be the best procedure. Or putting them in an ultrasonic cleaner - gotta be a big un to hold all four carbs without separating them.

Sooo, you're down to disassembly. Get a manual. Very valuable tool.
You'll want to remove the main and pilot jets without damaging them, then chuck 'em in some carb cleaner. You'll also want to blow out the idle mixture passage (either an air mix or a fuel mix screw lives there). This has to be kept at an optimal setting. It may already be there so you want to figure out where it was set to BEFORE YOU REMOVE IT! The best way to do this is to turn it in to seat fully. You don't need to tighten it down, just gently turn it in until it stops. Thumb and forefinger on the shaft of the screw driver is all the force you want on that adjustment screw. COUNT the number of turns in that it takes. Note fractions of turns too. Pay attention to the orientation of the slot in the screw against the carb body (take a picture).

You probably should do each carb as a separate project so you don't get mixed up about settings and I like to put jets back in the carb they came from. This also helps you to not get adjustment screw settings NOT mixed up.

The mixture screw will have a spring, a washer, and a o-ring on it. The washer goes between the spring and the o-ring. The spring might come out with the screw, the washer and o-ring will do what they please. Probably stick in the hole. And turn sideways. A paper clip can be your friend or a bit of single strand wire. Put a little bend in it and fish the washer and o-ring out. It helps to not do this in a gravel driveway while drinking beer with your friends. Work over a table and put paper towels down to keep stuff from bouncing/rolling away into never never land. Once everything is removed blow the crap out of that passage. You do have an air compressor don't you? You need a load of pressure - canned air is better than your lungs though. Put the spring on the needle screw, then the washer, then the o-ring and screw it into the hole all the way to seat, gently again, then back it out the number of turns you counted previously. Your main jet and slow jet were sitting in the carb cleaner. Take 'em out, rinse 'em off and blow through them. Hold them up to a light source and make sure you can see through them. Hang on tight while blowing through them so they don't end up in the neighbor's yard. He probably hates you because you have a bike so you don't want to make his day by having him hear you shouting obscenities about the tiny part you just shot into outer space.

Put those back in the carb and move on to the next one. Repeat until finished or so upset by the missing parts you want to burn the bike.

I'm not certain about this bike, but it may have an enrichener circuit or it may just have a simple choke. The choke is a butter fly valve at the airbox side of the carb. If it ain't there you have an enrichener circuit. Get the manual out to see how that works. You pull the choke knob out and that opens passages that let more fuel into the carbs. That should be cleared as well.

There may also be an accelerator pump. You guessed right. It needs to be blown out too. You'll need to consult the manual on that too. I've filled up enough space here.

The bike has been sitting around for a long time so whatever fuel was left behind has turned into varnish. If it was an ethanol blend it may have done some other neat tricks too. You may have had living things growing in there and there may have been some oxidation of the openings in some of those jets. I've looked at old jets through a microscope and they can take on the appearance of the moon's surface. At that point they're junk and need replacing. Otherwise you will never get the bike running optimally. On some bikes the pilot jet may be press fit into the carb's body and therefore difficult to remove. And difficult to source new ones. The good news is that the pilot/slow jets aren't the main jets. You can get it running even if those are crummy inside. But they can't be clogged or you'll go nuts trying to get it running.

ONE LAST IMPORTANT DETAIL. Those jets and the air (or fuel) mixture screw are made of cheese. They're harder than the Phillips head screws you mangeld taking the float bowl off, but they shouldn't be forced. If they don't break loose easily you need to get some penetrating oil like WD 40 or PB Blaster or similar and spray the poop out of them. Stop what you're doing and find another project. For at least 24 hours. Then try again. Repeat if needed but DO NOT FORCE ONE OF THESE ITEMS OR YOU WILL BE SORRY WHEN IT BREAKS OFF AND YOU HAVE AN UNRETRIEVABLE PIECE STUCK IN YOUR CARB.

A note about those Phillips head screws that hold the top and the float bowl on. They're different from similar screws on other stuff. The Japanese like you to buy tools. So do all the other manufacturers for that matter. A hand impact (I like Sears Craftsman) will do the job but a Japanese Industrial Standard screwdriver is what you want. If you use the impact driver with a good bit on it you have to put more force into pushing the driver into the screw than you put into turning it.
 

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I recently picked up a 86 model and its doing the same thing. Come to find out they drilled out the main jets on my double barrel carbs. Now if you are sitting on the bike, the right side cover comes off and you will see the air box. Then you will see the fuse box, there is a little cover right thr next to the fuse box with 2 clips that will allow it to come off and bam air filter access.
 
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