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Discussion Starter #1
So I'm a new rider, and my first bike is a 1980 Honda CM200T Twinstar bobber project bike. I chose to get a fixer upper for two reasons: one is I work at target so as you can imagine I'm totally loaded with cash *sarcasm*, and the second is that much like my mentality on buying a first car a wihle back I prefer things I have to fix as my first vehicle so I actually understand the parts inside when things go wrong later.

Anyways, the reason for this thread is that I have downloaded the complete repair and maintenance manual for my bike and it is nearly useless in answering my question. When I got the bike it needed a few things: turn signals, brake light, front brake lever, replace carb, speedo cable, front brake cable. Now the beauty of this bike is that it's on a 6v system so it's a pain in the nether regions to find the electrical components for it. After managing to find them I have figured out (no thanks to the book) how to wire the rear turn signals and brake like, but can't figure out the front signals. I was wondering if anyone could possibly help me out in this regard. the closest I've come to getting them to work is by wiring them directly to the headlight, which causes the headlight be be constantly on regardless of switch, so it's obviously not wired correctly, as well as the front lights only to be constantly on regardless of turn signal switch.

A bit of a long winded post, and for that I apologize, but thank you in advance for any sage words of wisdom anyone may bestow upon this issue.

Chris
 

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Hi & welcome to the forum :)

I don't understand your question.. If you've already wired up the rear turn signals, can't you just wire up the front signals in parallel to the rears? Are you having a problem with them blinking, or are you trying to get running lights to work? Are the front signal bulbs 1 or 2 filament bulbs?

And, youch re: the 6 volt system
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yeah pics would probably help in this situation, but I'll try and clarify a bit..

So on the back lights there 5 wires (one for power to brakes and both signals, two for steady on brake and stopping light, and two for respective signals). On the front under the headlight there are completely different colors that are open connections that in no way match the wires for the signals in back. When I do a trial and error with these the best I can get (for signals not DTRL) is a steady on that bypasses both the turn signal switch AND the headlight switch, making both constant "on" lights.

When I unplugged some of the wires that were the same color up front as the ones in back, it seemed to mess with the engines electrical, killing the engine in just a minute or so, and actually overloaded one wire (the brown) so the plastic casing started melting, unplugged that pretty fast.

These are single filament bulbs, to my understanding this bike didn't originally come with DTRL. The back don't blink currently but I figure that could have to do with not having the front installed since I know a bulb out can cause a constant on as well.

And yeah that's the beauty of an old bike, not much info, and has its own version of electrical since they didn't switch to 12v until the year AFTER my bike was made haha

Hope that helps clarify a bit
 

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Have you considered getting a VOM and using it to find out what you have? I have a digital meter that I got from Walmart using their on-line shopping mode for about 10 bucks. When you have a meter you can just test each connection to find out what is energized when and start building a table that will give you your answers. If a load is only energized when you select a right side signal mark that in your table and check the next wire. Soon you will know all about your wiring. Note, if your bike has an old fashioned flasher it will be on steady when it is burned out instead of flashing. The right circuit will still energize but not flash. For that situation, replace the flasher itself for a couple of bucks.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the advice on the VOM, I have something like that but not sure if that's what it is since I got it for working on cars so I'll check. As far as the flasher, I assume you mean Tue small metal canister looking thing that appears to be part of the turn signal system. If that's the case it should be pretty cheap, and its an extremely easy fix.
 

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That is exactly what one of those old flashers looks like. Maybe 3/4 inch diameter and an inch or so tall. It works by heating up to cause the contacts to open then cooling back down and they close. Totally simple mechanical design but it served the auto industry well for several decades. It usually failed by having the heater fail so it stayed in the closed contact configuration.
VOM is Volt, Ohm, Milliameter. It is what most cheap meters are as well as some far more expensive ones with more bells and whistles. For automotive or bike troubleshooting get the cheapest one you can find. What we do is not exactly rocket science.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Okay great, I know the part then, thank you haha i just need to find the replacement... probably on the website I used for the bolt I had to replace as well.. and yeah the one I have does internal temperature and all kinds of fun thiings i never figured out haha perhaps I should actually read the manual that came with it since I never got around to that. The car got totalled shortly after receiving the VOM so it now sits in a box in the garage. As it sits now I think I may have to replace the gasket for the valve cover (think that's the part on the very top any ways) as well since it still is leaking oil onto my exhaust pipes.
 
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