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Hello
Let me start by saying that I was given a 1980 CM400T about two years ago. The bike was sitting for nearly 12 years. After a new battery, oil, gas, tires & tubes, and plugs, the bike literally started right up and has been running great.
So far I have put about 2k miles on it, never had an issue. The bike has always leaked a little bit of fuel from underneath the carbs, but that has never been a problem.
Now there appears to be an oil leak. I get some smoke and some oil collecting on the top of the power chamber, and it seems to be leaking just right behind the chain. I've included some pics in this post of this problem area for reference.

Where I need advice - I am not a mechanic, nor have I ever done any extensive work on a car or bike. I assume the seals are shot on this bike and need to be replaced. I believe there is a seal kit I could purchase and do myself, and I would also plan to pull the carbs and perform a thorough cleaning, although I've read some nightmare stories regarding this.

Anyhow, for a rookie like me, who has the technical skill and the desire to perform this task at hand, should this be something I could tackle over the course of the winter and get this bike up and running again, or should I not waste my time as my lack of expertise in this area lead me down the wrong path?

The bike currently runs great. If it weren't for the slight oil leak and little bit of gas that occasionally drips out, you wouldn't know there was an issue.
Should I sell this bike instead and let somebody else do their own repairs?
In the end I'd hate to have a bike that no longer runs because I was the guy to disassemble it...
 

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I had one of those when I was 17 one of the toughest bikes ever made. It's really unbelievable the amount of abuse that bike took from me and my 16 yr old brother. I'd keep it and try to fix it if I were you. For sure lube or better yet replace that chain right away though!
 

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Get a good service manual, make sure you have the correct tools and give it a try. There is nothing like hands on experience and a good manual can make all the difference. The worst that would probably happen is that you would have to take it to a shop to finish the job. The best case is you learn something, fix the bike and save a lot of money. I've got a 77 CB400T waiting its turn in my shop.:icon_cool:
 

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Nice bike, congratulations!!

Clean the heck out of that bike, wash it front to back and get it as clean as possible. Then run/ride the bike, checking the area often. This will lead you to the source of the leak and then you'll know exactly what to replace.
 
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