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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I started a video restoration build... Ill post as I progress! Any and all feedback or suggestions is welcomed!

Initial Start:


Seat Replacement:

 

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OK, so I am gonna answer your questions here that you asked elsewhere. It is probably a good idea to ask your questions on a thread you started yourself so it is easy for your "helpers" to find them all.

There are many ways to clean the gas tank. I usually start on the fuel residue first by buying a gallon of lacquer thinner. First, you can buy some fresh gasoline and soak the old crappy tank for a day or 2 to get some of the old fuel out. This gas is then trash that must be disposed of properly. then take a quart of the lacquer thinner and swirl it about the tank to loosen and flush the dried deposits. Again, dispose of properly. The idea is that the lacquer thinner will dissolve the sludge and dried crystals of gasoline that have turned to varnish. You might be surprised how much "rust' you think is in there is actually varnish. Rust in the tank is another subject, but I promise you that getting rid of the gas residue first is what makes rust removal easier.

On cleaning your carbs, I would strongly recommend that you not separate them from each other before trying to clean the passages.I saw a pro clean a set of carb passages and he was of the mind that less is more. He had the discipline to take each carb and work on it one at a time so as not to mix any parts from one carb to the others and it did not slow him down a bit. As one set of jets hit the ultrasonic cleaner, he took the next parts off the second carb and worked his way down the line.
Remember that the gunk in the carbs will also be present in the fuel lines between the tank and the carbs, so replacing the line can eliminate fresh gunk from reaching your refreshed carbs. All I got for now...
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Restoring Faded Gas Tank Paint

I used No. 7 rubbing compound and turtle was, bought at Ace Hardware. The rubbing compound even took off some surface rust.

Original Condition:


Applying Rubbing Compound:


After Rubbing Compound No Wax:


Turtle Wax:
 

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It is likely the clutch can be adjusted near where the cable goes into the transmission. most likely loosen the locknut, turn the screw in until tight and out 1/2 turn.
 

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Wow, tank came out great!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
There are many ways to clean the gas tank. I usually start on the fuel residue first by buying a gallon of lacquer thinner. First, you can buy some fresh gasoline and soak the old crappy tank for a day or 2 to get some of the old fuel out. This gas is then trash that must be disposed of properly. then take a quart of the lacquer thinner and swirl it about the tank to loosen and flush the dried deposits. Again, dispose of properly. The idea is that the lacquer thinner will dissolve the sludge and dried crystals of gasoline that have turned to varnish. You might be surprised how much "rust' you think is in there is actually varnish. Rust in the tank is another subject, but I promise you that getting rid of the gas residue first is what makes rust removal easier.
Thanks for the advice... I bought some muriatic acid to use but think its a little overboard. The tank doesn't have rust inside it, just varnish so I think the lacquer thinner is the better option. Im going to have someone do the carb rebuild for me though. People are telling me that it is a tedious operation and if someone hasnt done it before, it is no simple task.
 

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Thanks for the advice... I bought some muriatic acid to use but think its a little overboard. The tank doesn't have rust inside it, just varnish so I think the lacquer thinner is the better option. Im going to have someone do the carb rebuild for me though. People are telling me that it is a tedious operation and if someone hasnt done it before, it is no simple task.
Just be VERY CAREFUL of the lacquer thinner around that pretty paint! Use it more to soak the nasties out of the bottom. If you do turn the tank upside down, it is better to plug the fuel opening with a rubber stopper that will not let the fuel get on the paint.

I cleaned a very nice tank in that manner and I also smeared the entire painted surface with automotive grease just in case some lacquer spilled over. If it does spill, wipe away the thinner and re-apply grease. Someone else took my lacquer advice and taped around the tank opening. Fumes or spilled lacquer ruined his paint job:frown: and he was not happy with me.

Once your tank is clean, take a 50/50 mix of oil and gasoline and swish it about. The gas will dry away and leave a coating of oil to protect against rust.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Just be VERY CAREFUL of the lacquer thinner around that pretty paint! Use it more to soak the nasties out of the bottom. If you do turn the tank upside down, it is better to plug the fuel opening with a rubber stopper that will not let the fuel get on the paint.

I cleaned a very nice tank in that manner and I also smeared the entire painted surface with automotive grease just in case some lacquer spilled over. If it does spill, wipe away the thinner and re-apply grease. Someone else took my lacquer advice and taped around the tank opening. Fumes or spilled lacquer ruined his paint job:frown: and he was not happy with me.

Once your tank is clean, take a 50/50 mix of oil and gasoline and swish it about. The gas will dry away and leave a coating of oil to protect against rust.
Eh, already spilled a little but wiped it off each time. Only when swooshing it around, gas cap leaks. Hopefully it only ate the first layer of wax! But Im not too concerned about it. haha We will see what happens
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Just be VERY CAREFUL of the lacquer thinner around that pretty paint! Use it more to soak the nasties out of the bottom. If you do turn the tank upside down, it is better to plug the fuel opening with a rubber stopper that will not let the fuel get on the paint.

I cleaned a very nice tank in that manner and I also smeared the entire painted surface with automotive grease just in case some lacquer spilled over. If it does spill, wipe away the thinner and re-apply grease. Someone else took my lacquer advice and taped around the tank opening. Fumes or spilled lacquer ruined his paint job:frown: and he was not happy with me.

Once your tank is clean, take a 50/50 mix of oil and gasoline and swish it about. The gas will dry away and leave a coating of oil to protect against rust.
How long do you think I should soak the tank?... Its been 1 day so far.
 

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In one day the lacquer thinner will dissolve everything it can. It does reach a saturation point. You could then try to rinse the tank further with some gasoline to see if it is clean.

After that, if anything remains, you could try some more thinner, but occasionally I have seen some almost black tar in the bottom that nothing will touch, so I leave it alone. [well, maybe something like MEK would dissolve it,but that stuff is nasty]

When it comes to the newer gas with ethanol blend, I really do not have the answer for that gray powdery sludge that it leaves behind. Most of my experience is with 70's bikes that sat for 10 years with the non-ethanol stuff
 

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Discussion Starter #11
In one day the lacquer thinner will dissolve everything it can. It does reach a saturation point. You could then try to rinse the tank further with some gasoline to see if it is clean.

After that, if anything remains, you could try some more thinner, but occasionally I have seen some almost black tar in the bottom that nothing will touch, so I leave it alone. [well, maybe something like MEK would dissolve it,but that stuff is nasty]

When it comes to the newer gas with ethanol blend, I really do not have the answer for that gray powdery sludge that it leaves behind. Most of my experience is with 70's bikes that sat for 10 years with the non-ethanol stuff
So I soaked the tank for two days, then dumped out the lacquer. Inside the tank it is still full of gunk, gelatin looking junk... It's all loosened up quite a bit but I need a way to get it off the walls still. So, I put some nuts and bolts and washers in it with some water and oxy-clean and shook it up a bunch, tomorrow Ill be shaking it more and rinsing it out a lot. Might even take it to the car wash to use the power sprayer.
 

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So I soaked the tank for two days, then dumped out the lacquer. Inside the tank it is still full of gunk, gelatin looking junk... It's all loosened up quite a bit but I need a way to get it off the walls still. So, I put some nuts and bolts and washers in it with some water and oxy-clean and shook it up a bunch, tomorrow Ill be shaking it more and rinsing it out a lot. Might even take it to the car wash to use the power sprayer.
I have had some luck with Oxy. Usually works best with very hot water--let it sit for a half hour, rinse and repeat. I also have had luck with Pine-Sol after the Oxy-- about one part pine-sol to 2 parts hot water. I have also tried Ammonia and the various grease cutters in gallon size like you get at Home Depot.

The important thing to note is that once you use water in the tank, you need to watch for rust and get the tank dry. Dry it the best you can by turning upside down and getting a towel in that little lip at the fuel opening followed by a gasoline rinse of a cup and then repeat. Follow up with some motor oil and gas mix to protect the tank. Use a shop vac to blow air into the opening to finish off the drying. It is not an exact science when some of the gunk comes from ethanol and some comes from old school gas. Keep at it and you should get there. Please share with us whatever works best for you.
 

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Looks really good. So long as any leftovers are hard and tight so to speak, the tank will be fine. I would suggest a small inline filter between the tank and carbs and also new fuel line.

Well done!
 
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