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I just got my 1975 Honda cb360t, love it but I cannot figure out how to get the front brake from sticking. With the front wheel raised, it does not spin freely. You can clearly see the pads are touching the disc. I tried adjusting the stopper bolt and nut on the caliper as stated in a manual I found online, does not seem to do much. Wheel still does not spin freely.

This is sooo irritating as when I ride it causes loud squealing. I am no mechanic but also am not a total noob. Please give me clear step by step instructions if you can help, I am also a huge fan of pics showing what you are talking about as parts often go by several names.

Someone please help!
 

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There are two likely problems that can cause this:

1) The caliper pistons are getting stuck. Clean the brake caliper pistons to fix this. You might as well replace the seals while you have it apart.

2) The pressure relief valve in the master cylinder is sticking. Clean out the master cylinder of any contamination. It may also need to be rebuilt, depending on the severity.

A less likely cause could be clogged brake lines, but that's not nearly as common as the two first issues.
 

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Ok, I appreciate the advice, may you provide any instructions? There is not too much info on the web and I like details. Thanks again!
 

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Ok, I appreciate the advice, may you provide any instructions? There is not too much info on the web and I like details. Thanks again!
You may want to invest in a Clymer, Hayes or even a Honda Factory Service manual. Either that or find a local bike shop willing to work on a 38 year old bike.
 

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I already have a clymers, still doesnt give much info and it seems to have been written by a dyslectic in the 70's. The bike is not a barn find, it is in superb condition other than the brake deal. I would think this should be something minor as this was a regular rider from the past owner. If someone could just give me some good tips like above WITH step by step instructions and a pic here and there I would be fine. Anyone out there up to the challenge??
 

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The caliper is simply a cylinder with a piston in it. You pull it off, hold it over a pan and pump the hand lever. The piston will pop out. All there will be is a seal in a groove inside the caliper and probably an external rubber cover to keep dirt out.

If there is any corrosion you can scrape it out with a metal pick with dulled edges (like a clay sculpting tool) very carefully so as not to damage the cylinder bore. Then you can sand it out with some 1500 grit wet/dry (extremely fine) if needed, then polish it out with some Flitz metal polish. You can clean the piston in a similar way, maybe some 0000 steel wool and polish it. Lube up all the parts with DOT3 or 4 when reassembling.

You may as well replace brake pads. If not, sand them a bit. Squealing is usually caused by dirty pads or if the pads are not mating up relatively flush with the rotor.

The brake pads may slightly drag even after a rebuild because the only thing that retracts them is the internal O-ring seal. It flexes out when the brakes are applied, then pulls back a few thousandths when pressure is released. So when the wheel is spun it will scuff lightly.

From cars to bikes I find disc brakes have some sort of mystique about them, mostly false. Drum brakes are much harder to take apart and deal with. The only nuisance about disc brakes is really the bleeding of the brake lines.

For bleeding, if you live near a Harbor Freight store, consider buying one of their vacuum bleeders, the best $30 I spent on tools in a long time. Just use very low vacuum pressure and barely crack open the bleeder. Also have someone to keep the master cylinder filled.
 

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This ^^^^
It really is pretty easy. If you would happen to use air pressure instead of hydraulic, make sure that you wrap a rag around the caliper so the piston does not go flying across the shop....
Buy a set of flare wrenches to take any brake lines loose. Money well spent.
 

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I used a six point socket to get the bleeder loose at first, then a box end, but flare wrenches are good if you have the money to do it. Always good to have more tools.

By the way, while at Harbor Freight to get a couple of $4.99 24" tire irons, I noticed they sell their mechanic's stethoscope for like $3! Great to listen to any noise in an engine to locate where it is coming from. I could locate which of the valves is loose (I have two at .011", spec is .010, but it's not worth pulling the cams to get to the shims under the buckets for that small an adjustment, as confirmed by a couple factory trained mechanics I know). Great when you need it and cheap at HF. Lots of goodies there that work fine for the average guy. Even a giant adjustable jaw (Crescent, but not the brand) wrench for under $30.

I'm trying to save some cam chain tensioner cash to buy one of their lifts. Maybe finally this spring...
 
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