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Six-String Jockey
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Discussion Starter #1
At the request of one of the Super Moderators on this forum I am posting a restoration thread on my 1970 Yamaha R5 350. I hope all of you enjoy this trip with me. This restoration took place in November and December of last year.
Here it is in it's entirety - spaced out with a few days in between each post . . .
:wink:

Hi Folks,
I'm new to the forum and thought I'd like to share my adventures with like-minded Yamaha enthusiasts. I recently picked up (free) a totally trashed 1970 Yamaha R5 350. I've always wanted to own one of these and jumped at the opportunity. I am a 30 years of experience (now retired) mechanic and really enjoy the challenge of the restoration. I've attached some "Before" photos and will keep updating the thread with progress pictures.





 

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Six-String Jockey
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1,858 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
That bike looks like it will be a real hoot to ride! Have fun with the resto!

I will! And you're right . . . the Yamaha 350's from the 70's were renowned for their acceleration, often (with the right rider) embarrassing 650's.
Stay tuned for more. Same Bat channel. Same Bat station.
 

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Six-String Jockey
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1,858 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Well, the work has started in earnest. I'm ready to go to the paint shop and I'm ready to start rebuilding the engine . . . almost. The crank wouldn't rotate 360 degrees! :( It turned out that the lead weight in the counter balance part of the crank somehow came loose and moved into the little space where the rod rotates. After various consultations, I decided to drill a small hole through the crank and into the lead portion. I countersunk the hole and then put a flat-head screw in to hold the lead in place. I then welded the screw in so it would NEVER come loose. I filed it down so it's smooth and has the same clearance it had before. Cool. More updates coming . . .



 

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Super Moderator
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I will! And you're right . . . the Yamaha 350's from the 70's were renowned for their acceleration, often (with the right rider) embarrassing 650's.
Stay tuned for more. Same Bat channel. Same Bat station.
Yep....they were (are) stupid-fast. Rode my brother's Kenny Roberts RZ350 (which the RD morphed into) and the damn thing would throttle-wheelie at will.
Wow....loving this thread already! Great pix, BTW!:biggrin:
 

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Six-String Jockey
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1,858 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Seat repair and re-upholstering . . . I think I'd rather get a napalm enema than do another one of those. :eek: If you do one yourself, throw away the little "bolt things" that hold the cool chrome strip around the base of the seat, or believe me, you're gonna wish you were dead. Go to the hardware store and purchase the correct size rivets and some push-nuts. MUCH easier!

I should have the engine totally back together in a day or so . . . more to follow.





I'll be out of town for a few days . . . next update coming Novemeber 1st.
 

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Six-String Jockey
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1,858 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Well, the engine went back together very smoothly . . . until I got to the clutch. *Sigh* See below . . .
Then I decided to tackle the front forks. Talk about oil! The ground beneath the sands of the Middle East ain't got nothin' on these shocks. I felt like changing my name to Yabdul Sahib.



 

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Six-String Jockey
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Discussion Starter #13
The side covers came out very nice. I'll let the paint dry for several more days before I actually stick the decals on. I decided that the only way to continue from here was to have everything totally clean. I can't stand working on greasy, filthy parts . . . never could. Anyway, the bottom picture, although necessary, still makes my teeth sweat. :(




 

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Six-String Jockey
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Discussion Starter #15
This is the 'low point' of a rebuild. The excitement of tearing the bike down is over, and now the only part of the entire process that is truly "work" begins. Every single piece, every nut, bolt, washer . . . everything gets washed and/or wire buffed until it gleams. There is however, a certain sense of instant gratification as each part appears from out underneath all the dirt and grease to become a beautiful shiny part again. Yes, I discovered the gears in the speedometer have been stripped. And, yes, I did make up a few new words in my deliriously happy display immediately following the discovery. Oh well, there are ALWAYS alternatives. The rims are at the tire shop getting brand new tires and tubes put on. When I pick them up I'll replace all the bearings and seals.





 

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Six-String Jockey
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Discussion Starter #17
Awesome pix!
So you use paint then, and not powdercoat on the frame, swingarm and triple tree?

Correct - Not as tough - but it looks great and it's cheaper. I put 2 coats of primer and 2-3 coats of black. I just have to be careful when I'm installing parts on the frame.
 

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Super Moderator
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I have a powdercoater who will clean, sandblast AND powdercoat frame, swingarm and triple tree for $250.00. When I figure in the time wasted in man/hours, paint and materials, I think I come out ahead. It's tough stuff, too.
 

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Six-String Jockey
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Discussion Starter #19
Ha! I'm all done with the painting portion. All the myriad of little parts are all waiting to be installed. I have to do some work on the two wheels first . . . bearings and seals for both. And THEN It will start going the other way. Back together. I'm excited!




 

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Six-String Jockey
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Discussion Starter #20
Well, the prep work has ended. Now begins the wonderful journey of building a classic motorcycle.:biggrin:



 
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