Motorcycle Forum banner
1 - 20 of 35 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hey im 16 and i just bought a kawasaki 550 ltd off my girlfriends brother for 300 he gave me a good deal he was going to sell it to someone else for 800 .. it has new sprockets new tires new clutch etc.... all it needs is a new igniter. .......anyways my only problem is that is at my gf's house and my parents dont know i have it and i keep asking them if i can get my motorycle permit next spring after i get my liscence(in november) and they keep saying no... i ride dirtbike i got a crf 230 i sneak it out on the streets and ride and im good at that. i know theres hazards involved but i really want to get my permit but i need some advice to talk my parents into the idea
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Being a parent I'd want you to be up front and honest or you can be sure you'll not ride a bike. Tell them how much you really want to learn to ride on the street. Tell them that you will be taking the Motorcycle Safety Course. You need to show them how responsible you are with everything you do. You may start out with "Can we discuss me getting a motorcycle?" Don't say I already have one because that would **** me off if my daughter said that to me. Obviously you want to be relaxed in this discussion, not aggressive at all. Agree with what they say a lot.
Whatever you do you have to have their permission so you have to be understanding with them also.
If you were my son I'd say no. The street is very dangerous and you have no experience with what can happen on the street. Even in a car things you haven't thought of will be happening and maybe or maybe not you'll get in an accident. On a bike you would be mutilated or dead. Girls don't care for guys that are missing limbs or can't ever walk and I'm sure they'd never have sex with you if you're dead, lol.

Best wishes to you. Be smart if they let you. If you think you'll never get killed or hit a stop sign and have your leg go flying think again because that just happened. Here is something for you to consider: http://www.consumershero.com/archives/579 and there's plenty more besides that one.

I just want you to think about the whole responsibility of riding on the street. Good luck to you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
727 Posts
Dude, you are a minor. They don't have to like it, are not going to like it, and you can't make them like it. You might as well jump in a pool of sharks THEN decide how you are going to pull the plug on the tank. Good luck, but them telling you you can't go for license in Nov should be a sign that they aren't going to let you have the bike. Talking them into it is something you'll have to figure out, my friend. And making the deal behind their back without any kind of blessing or permission isn't a good way to show you are responsible enough to own and ride the machine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
yes i do understand that it is irrisponsible of me to buy one behind my partents back but it was too good of a deal to pass up...and belive me i dont want to wreck i dont want to die yet and i dont want to lose limbs but i love working on bikies i love riding them and i love driving them
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
and i when i said liscence i meant class c car liscence i got my permit in late april and my parents said dont even talk about it until i get my licence
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,491 Posts
There are a lot more things you need to worry about right now rather than a "good deal" on a bike.

The biggest of these worries is RESPONSIBILITY. Are you responsible enough to have good grades, help with household chores without being told, or accepting the wishes of your parents? The reason for all of these things is to teach you to enter into adulthood with a well rounded knowledge of the proper way of handling life's little problems before they end up smacking you between the eyes.

So, now you've bought a bike...OK, you've got a few choices. You can go against the wishes of your parents and ride the bike. OR, you can tell your parents about the bike, recognize their objections and hope they will allow you to keep the bike so you can gradually do a restoration on it with the understanding you are going to sell the bike when it is fixed up, OR you can attempt to sell the bike "as is" and hope to make a few bucks.

Your choice!!

CD
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,294 Posts
Have you given any thought to who will be paying for your injuries if you do happen to have a mishap on your dirtbike or the other bike you just purchased? I am not sure if you have a job or not, but you will need to purchase some sort of insurance for you and your bike, and hopefully where you work will cover your medical expenses should that unplanned mishap occur.

To show some responsibility, draw up a plan...purchase appropriate insurance and gear, sign up for a MSF or a Rider's Edge course, take your test, pass your course, take your final test or receive an endorsement, work on your bike...your parents would see that you are somewhat responsible in planning and safety and not fight the issue...but remember you are still a minor!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
I hate to splash water on this, but:

I wouldn't recommend a motorcycle to Any person who hasn't even logged car miles yet.

I know you have a passion for this, but, as the father of a large family, I would Never agree to a 16-year old just-starting-to-drive young man start pursuing motorcycling.

Wait until you are 18 or 19 when you have at least had a couple of car driving years under your belt.

I love riding, but, I also know - riding is one of the most dangerous things you can ever pursue. There are no second chances. You Have to be ready.

You're not ready.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,528 Posts
My parents would've been ticked if I had done that. They also said I couldn't get my license until I had my own car, my friend took me to get it. I did fine and they let me borrow their car sometimes but I always made sure to have it back to them when they said and with gas. I was 18 when I got my first bike, my dad went with me to see it and he drove it back for me. But I had their ok on it, which I still can't believe to this day my mom said ok!
Sit your parents down tell them you would like to talk about something. Tell them you bought the bike, great deal and you love working on them and riding. Do not get mad even if they do...I know..easier said than done but keep your cool. If they say no then it's no, sell the bike and wait until a better time. They are your parents and they worry about you. You will never out grow them worrying about you...get used to it.
If they say yes, this would be a good bike to begin on. Take it easy, no riding after dark, wear gear...yes I know it's hot. Stick to back streets for awhile until you get used to highways and such in your car first. Take your time fixing it and spend time behind the wheel of the car. Get used to the way people act on the street. Do not get used to thinking they see you...they don't.
Good luck:thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
727 Posts
My parents would've been ticked if I had done that. They also said I couldn't get my license until I had my own car, my friend took me to get it. I did fine and they let me borrow their car sometimes but I always made sure to have it back to them when they said and with gas. I was 18 when I got my first bike, my dad went with me to see it and he drove it back for me. But I had their ok on it, which I still can't believe to this day my mom said ok!
My dad bought me a KZ400 for my 15th birthday as in Indiana one can get a motorcycle learners permit at 15. I had my choice of a car or a motorcycle and at the time dad had an emaculate 81 750 LTD. I loved that bike! So I chose the bike. Was VERY surpized mom didn't have a cow over it. To this day she still makes a point to tell me how much she hates motorcycles.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
10,756 Posts
To show some responsibility, draw up a plan...purchase appropriate insurance and gear, sign up for a MSF or a Rider's Edge course, take your test, pass your course, take your final test or receive an endorsement, work on your bike...your parents would see that you are somewhat responsible in planning and safety and not fight the issue...but remember you are still a minor!
Be honest with them. You messed up by buying the bike behind there back. Time to come clean and do the things 4Raven mentioned. I am a parent, and my soon to be 16 year old will be riding, but with a plan and under my rules. This is our plan. You need to talk to your folks and start planning.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
4,381 Posts
A Ton of excellent advice has been shown so far! :thumbsup:
I started riding when I was 14.
I was NOT ALLOWED to ride motorcycles and was beaten be my Father EVERY TIME that he found out about it.
It did not stop me.
I rebuilt my first motorcycle engine at 14 Y.O. ;)
My arguement to my parents was that I had ridden FASTER on my bicycle with erasers for brakes and no suspension. I didn't work! :mad:
I started riding street bikes when I was 15 Y.O. and only rode at night on backroads.
I learned an awful lot by doing that and logged over 20,000 miles before I got my MC license at 17 (again, my parents did not know that I had one.)
I moved out at 17 with the Court's permission (long story) and had my street bike.
They could no longer STOP me from riding at that point and the beatings STOPPED! :thumbsup:
I do not recommend leaving home just to follow your dreams but it worked for me.
I graduated early from H.S. with 3 more credits than were needed to graduate.
I had 3 jobs and was going to College (youngest person in ALL of my classes.)
The Judge determined that I was a RESPONSIBLE ADULT.
I have children that I taught to ride at a very young age (10 Y.O.)
I have tried to be exactly opposite of my Father to my children and allow them to enjoy life and its hardships so as to help them mature earlier than other children their age.
Do as your parents wish as Iamjustifyd said and you will eventually earn the right to be treated as an ADULT.

Eric
 

·
Ghost in the machine
Joined
·
2,857 Posts
A little harsh, but here goes.... Sell it to the guy who wanted it for $800! IMHO, you are not yet capable of making responsible decisions. IE: you are an unlicensed minor and could not legally have even entered into a sales agreement. You cannot legally transfer the title to your name. You cannot insure it, because you can't own it. And above all you are lying to your parents about it. Start showing your ability to make some good decisions now, and maybe you'll earn a little more trust from your parents in the future.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
144 Posts
I'm sure the majority of people who have posted their comments to this thread have been 16 at one point in their life. :wink: We all remember what it was like trying to find our identity, learning how to handle increased independence and responsibility, and sure we had success and failures along the way.
I think one thing we can agree on is that you won't be 16 for very long. In two years you will be 18 and in the eyes of the legal community an "adult". Now the question is what can you do to prove that you are a responsible and mature member of the community.
First of all it is helpful that you were mature enough to recognize that you needed advice and that you could have trouble with your parents. Some teenagers would have come screeching into the driveway with the motorcycle and told there parents were to go if they didn't like it.
Now some advice I've thought of:
1. Do your parents have a place you can store this motorcycle for about two years? Show them you can think ahead to the future and ask them if you can store it while you work on it for a couple years. If you are really serious about this then they will see it in your dedication to working on this bike and it won't seem like a passing interest. Maybe even make the suggestion that after you fix it up if they don't like it still then you can sell it.
2. When you turn 18 like I said you are legally an adult and can make these kind of decisions so waiting a couple years really isn't as bad as it sounds. NOW I HIGHLY RECOMMEND you don't burn bridges with your family unless they are abusive or just completely dysfunctional (and I'll tell you all families are a little dysfunctional, I'm talking about families that just don't work together). You will find in your life that friends will come and go, but if you have a good relationship with your family then you always have a place to fall back on.
3. Finally, get some miles behind the wheel of a car. I agree with the other posts that have said that you will not be able to predict everything that can happen out there, but the more experience you have working with the flow of traffic and seeing what all those other morons out there do the better off you will be when you finally take away that 2,000 pounds of protective steel cage. Also I hope you are never involved in an accident, but I know from experience that sometimes you'll learn more from that one incident than from years of regular driving. Being in a car will make it easier to walk away from.
Whatever you decide to do good luck and be safe!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
610 Posts
Honestly, I wanted a motorcycle for my whole life, and when I was 16 I asked if I could buy one and they said no. And I couldn't be happier with their decision. reason being, no matter how responsible you think you're going to be, sometimes at 16 you just don't realize the consequences of your actions, so you tend to be a bit more reckless, and that little bit of extra recklessness could get you killed, on a motorcycle it's even more probable that you're gonna get hurt.

So now you want to break it in to your parents, well don't be surprised if they say no.

If I were you, for your own good, I'd wait another couple of years until you become a little wiser. That's what happened to me and at 22 I was able to buy my very first bike and I feel that if I would have bought it back wen I was 16, I might not be alive now...

Good luck and "Never ride faster that your guardian angel can fly"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
I tried to talk my parents into letting me get one when I was 16. They said no. Years later when I was old enough I almost got one and put it off and put it off. I just got my first one when I was 38.

To be honest I am glad I didnt get one when I was younger because I was too reckless.

rick
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,345 Posts
First off...
Your 16, so as they said before, you are a minor, so legally, they cant even sell you the bike. You cant title it.

Second, no insurance company in their right mind would ever insure a minor for a motorcycle without parental permission. And even if they did, your insurance rates are going to be insane.
Whos gonna pay for this?

Third, do you even have a motorcycle license yet?

Fourth, DO NOT RIDE THAT BIKE!!!! Aside from your probably overwhelming lack of experience riding, Im betting you will be riding "dirty", and at 16 years old if you mess up on that bike, your parents are going to be eating the costs....which will most likely include a MAJOR lawsuit...and you can kiss your girlfriend goodbye, cause after her family gets sued for selling a motorcycle to an unlicensed, uninsured minor, you will never see her again.

I dont know what kind of moron would sell a bike to an unlicened, uninsured minor without parental consent, but your girlfriends brother needs his head examined.

My suggestion...go get your $300 bucks back and forget that bike.

Take the $300 bucks to your parents, and tell them I still want to ride motorcycles, but I want to do it properly, and use the money to go take a MSF class and get your license.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
413 Posts
I agree with what everybody has said here. You are 16. Until you move out of your parents home, you will have to abide by their rules. It is called respect. They will probably be paying your insurance, they will have to help you pay the registration fees, they pay your health insurance (if God forbid something happens to you). I would tell them right away about your purchase, and tell them you'd like to learn to ride the right and safe way. You need to show them some RESPECT, and they will return the favor. But beause they respect you doesn't mean they will let you ride a bike. Respect goes a long way, and having your parents respect makes things much easier for you in the long run.

Example, you've got your driver's license and are out with some friends. You have a curfew of midnight. Something comes up and you know you are going to be home a bit late. Call you parents and letting them know assuming you are generally honest with them, and its probably not a big deal. You have a bad track record, or you don't tell them, and coming home late = loss of car privledges. Do the right thing here, trust me it will make life easier for you.
 
1 - 20 of 35 Posts
Top