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Discussion Starter #1
So I have only had my new to me triple for 2 weeks but I have noticed some interesting electrical issues.

First is that my kill switch resets my ECU and my starter wont work for a few minutes after I use it. By resetting my ECU it resets the clock, mileage on Trip A and B, my MPG, avg MPG, avg SPD, avg Distance, and highest speed. Then it will not let the bike turn on for a bit. When I press the starter, nothing. I read up on this and it seems some Triumphs are picky when it comes to shutting down the ECU and if it doesn't go through its normal procedures then it gets messed up. I have been shutting off with my key for the past few days with no issues. Any info on this or if I should be worried?

Second is my speedo. On the Interstate I noticed I was getting passed a lot when I was hovering around 70 in the fast lane. This prompted me to try a GPS speedo on my phone. Both matched up until 20 mph and then I get these discrepancies.

GPS vs Bike Speedometer
19 - 20
27 - 30
36 - 40
45 - 50
54 - 60
63 - 70

I am not too concerned with my Speedo, but it would be nice to fix it. Any ideas on this one too?


One small thing, the dingbat who had this before me put on a non clear front break reservoir but I want to be able to see what my brake fluid is at. Can I just unscrew the top and look inside or do I have to reseal it somehow? Also there are braided brake cables for the front and back. Is this any indication of something bad or good or just a preference? I thought I checked out everything before I bought but I didn't really think to look at brake cables. No issues braking either.

Other than these small issues bike is running great and I am loving it. Thanks for your help!
 

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It's normal for a speedometer to read lower than actual speed.

Steel braided brake cables won't expand as much as rubber ones, which allows for less lever movement to apply the brakes.

You can take the lid off to check the brake fluid level and just close it up again. Make sure the bars are level so none will spill out when opening it.

There is definitely something wrong with the cut off switch. I'd get that fixed.
 

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The reservoir should be filled to the full mark. Hopefully no air got into the lines. If the brakes are feeling mushy, that's probably what happened. If so, the air needs to be bled out.

Fill it up, check for leaks, and keep an eye on it. if the level continues to fall, you have a leak somewhere.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Brakes worry me. Maybe Ill have it checked at the shop. Would worn pads drain the reservoir that low?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Ok so I think the best bet here is to bleed the front brakes and refill. See how it does for a bit and if its dropping then I have a leak. If its not then I go on my merry way!
 

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Refill, bleed, refill. I think that's what you mean. Just want to make sure. It's already empty. You don't want to bleed any more out until the reservoir is full again.:thumbsup:
 

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Braided brake cables are great. They give you a firmer brake handle response than rubber lines simply because they're more like a metal line. Keep 'em.

If air has gotten into your brake lines the brakes will "pump up" to firm with repeated pulls of the brake lever. Air is compressible, unlike liquids. There are four or five different, all "acceptable" techniques for bleeding brakes. Get someone to teach you one that works. Or watch some Youtubes.

In contrast, "Mushy" brakes that won't "pump up" indicate a leak, however microscopic, sometimes not even enough to allow any visible fluid to escape.

A lot of times a bike will have mushy brakes due to a worn or damaged seal in the master or slave cylinder (caliper), or an insufficiently snugged brake line fitting, and a novice, first thing they'll do is install braided brake lines trying to correct it instead of rebuilding the master and slave cylinders --and snugging all the fittings.

Putting new seals in brake cylinders is child's play. Order the parts and be done in a few hours and your brakes will be great. Just be sure to install them right side/lip/... in or out. CAREFUL disassembly & take notes & pictures.

The biggest problem with brakes is that brake fluid absorbs moisture, right out of the air. It's hygroscopic. So you want to bleed your brakes every 10k miles or 2-3 years, depending whether you live in (humid) Alabama or (dry) Arizona.

This is ALSO why you want to crack open a BRAND NEW CAN of brake fluid every time you work on brakes. The can sitting on the shelf, if it wasn't 100% sealed, is now contaminated with water it absorbed out of the air. Spend the $7 on a fresh can.

Brake fluid with a few % of water in it can boil under repeated, strong brake application, leaving you with NO brakes when you need 'em most. More a problem for racers (and autos), downhill truckers.... than casual riders. Each % of water lowers the boiling point of the brake fluid a certain # of degrees)

The bigger problem is the water causes lines/calipers/pistons to rust, which is an even better reason to bleed/flush brakes on a regular basis. Rust will score the cylinders, destroy the seals, cause pistons to stick, etc.

So if your brakes pump up, bleed 'em. If it won't, and is mushy, find and fix the cause.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Refill, bleed, refill. I think that's what you mean. Just want to make sure. It's already empty. You don't want to bleed any more out until the reservoir is full again.:thumbsup:

Yes Refill, bleed, refill :)

My brakes are definitely not mushy. Ill try the pumping up. Thanks for the help! I think regardless of what is going on I just need to flush them and go from there. Gonna do it this weekend. I mind as well do the back brakes also because the fluid is looking fairly dark.
 

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These little bottles with a one-way valve are MY personal favorite for one-man bleeding of brakes.


If this style won't work then generally you'll need a second person to do it the old fashioned way, they crack (open) the bleeder valve, you depress the brake, they close the valve, you release the brake, top up the master cylinder every 3-4th cycle, repeat.

What you DON'T want to do is fail to top up the master cylinder and allow air to enter from the top while bleeding.
 

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If this style won't work then generally you'll need a second person to do it the old fashioned way, they crack (open) the bleeder valve, you depress the brake, they close the valve, you release the brake, top up the master cylinder every 3-4th cycle, repeat.
That's a good way to let air back into the system. The proper sequence is: apply pressure to the brake, briefly open the valve, closing it before the brake lever/pedal stops moving, then release the brake; check reservoir as needed.
 

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That's a good way to let air back into the system. The proper sequence is: apply pressure to the brake, briefly open the valve, closing it before the brake lever/pedal stops moving, then release the brake; check reservoir as needed.
Glad you don't have him on your ignore list like so many do. I do suspect your sequence is what he meant but one never really knows.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Well I did it. Im a bit proud of myself but I wanna say thanks to you all!

My front brake is like ten times 'grabbier' now. I cant believe I rode around with almost no fluid in it for so long. Barely any old yellow fluid came out. I bled her out and ran new fluid through her until no bubbles. I also did the back brake as it was rather cloudy and I had a new bottle open of fluid.

I rode around and tested it and all seemed ok. I hope I didnt mess it up and lose brakes down the road.
 

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The first time you do something like that it is scary. Oh heck, I worry about it every time.You'll be fine. If they are nice and solid and you got the bleeder valve tight, no problem.:thumbsup:
 

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WintrSol, air is NOT re-admitted to the system because I slip a hose over the bleeder into a cup/tub/bucket of brake fluid, forming a fluid seal. I don't just bleed onto the ground, wherever it squirts.
It comes down to 'how good are the threads on the bleeder'; I've serviced many a system where the threads are so loose it becomes a problem, and most were on motorcycles. When the pedal/lever reaches the end, and the person controlling the pedal/lever lets it back only a bit, or the catch bottle is enough below the bleeder that it can start a siphon, air can suck past the threads, so coordination on this is critical when you can't do both yourself. It's much less likely to happen if you open and close the bleeder while there is pressure in the system.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Well brakes are good now.

However I found the cause of my electrical issue and boy do I feel like a dummy.

At first I thought it was a Triumph thing with the kill switch but then my power loss and ECU reset was happening with the key. So I checked my connections and all seemed ok and I resolved to take it to a shop. Well today I was looking under the seat for my toolkit just to make sure I had it (new to me bike) and I picked up and move the battery. The positive wire was just barely loose. I think what was happening is that when the battery was set in its spot it was positioned so that the cable was wedged in a way so it appeared tight. However when I picked up the battery it became unwedged and was really loose. Maybe going over bumps and potholes in the road would occasionally bump it around in its spot causing the random power loss. Very weird. I tightened it up and all is good!

Never would of noticed the loose terminal unless I moved the battery.
 
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