Motorcycle Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I had a leak on the rear tire coming out around the valve steam base where it bolts to the rim i didn't know i wasnt supposed to use fix a flat till now but I've already made that mistake. Anyways my question is does the tire have a tube in it, it's a spoked rim and everything online says yes but it was my grandpa's bike and he says he never used tubes. I haven't taken the tire off yet I just wanted to see what yall had to say before I went farther I'm new to riding and just trying to learn as much as possible I work on all my stuff myself and this bike has been a pain so far to get running and now this just a pain in my butt lol and I just want to ride
 

·
American Legion Rider
Joined
·
26,362 Posts
Air coming from around the valve stem generally would indicate a tubeless but not always. Especially with spoked rims which are generally tubed. You have to goto extra work to go tubeless on spoked rims. Why do you not believe your grandpa? I would have believed ANYTHING my grandpa(s) told me without question.
 

·
Very Famous Person
Joined
·
10,009 Posts
--
The only way it would be tubeless would be if someone sealed up the rim on the inside where the spokes come through, enlarged the valve stem hole and put in a tubless valve stem. You can tell if it's a tubeless valve stem by carefully looking at if there is rubber on the outside of the hole (tubeless stem) or the rubber is coming straight out with no lip (meaning a tube inside). Now it is possible that some dealer just put in a tube or left the old tube in when changing the tire the last time ( and since he wouldn't have charged your grandfather, he might have just thought there wasn't a tube in it). Whether or not the tire itself is tubeless will not tell you as you can put a tube in a tubeless. One problem with sealing up the rim so it will run tubeless is after a fashion most will fail and you have to re-do the whole sealing process since it will probably leak out the valve stem base or a spoke on the rim, or remove the sealant from the inside and just go back to using a tube.

I have one rim that I sealed 5 years ago and is still holding air with absolutely no leak, while I couldn't get the front to quit leaking even after redoing it several times, so it has a tube. It's a lot less hassle if you just use a tube. I think 3 of 4 of mine failed (my son now has one bike and I don't have the records anymore).

--
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top