Motorcycle Forum banner
1 - 20 of 46 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I dug my TC125 out of the the shop where it has been for about 35 years. I always thought that this Beas unique because it has theb4 speed plus a two speed gear box. Great for climbing, but could kick it into high for the road.
As they say “ran when parked”. Except the rear wheel was off the rear axle might or might not be in my brothers tool box, the kick starter is broke and the snap ring that holds the sprocket to the hub to trap the rubber isolator has a worn out groove. Now I remember why I parked it.
Anyway I just finished a full stock restoration of my ‘68 Dodge Polara, that has been in the Family since 1970 and mine since 1985, so I am ready for a new project.
I am not sure if I will take it to the level of my car, but with some free time it may end up that way.

Any way I ordered a factory parts book and both the factory service manuals. It seems you need the TS125 manual for the engine and most other items, but need the TC supplement manual for two speed gearbox. I also have a few of the missing or damaged parts ordered.

Here is my last project. (Just went on a 1500 mile cruise in June)
68862


And here is my new project.
68863

68864
 

·
American Legion Rider & sub-Administrator
Joined
·
25,278 Posts
318 or 383 in the car? Looks showroom ready. Do you belong to a car club that will have shows so others can see your work? Looking forward to see the end result of your new project.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,565 Posts
The TC and TS125 share many of the same parts as the TC & TS185. That might help with your part sourcing.

It's one of the easiest engines to work on. Second gear is a weak link, once you get it going if you are going to ride it hard, ride it hard in any gear other then second. (2nd gear is press fit onto the countershaft and can spin loose)

Your rear sprocket cushion drive failed when the rear wheel bearings went out. Original swingarm bushings are marginal to say the least, I made new ones out of bronze and it was an upgrade.

The kick start levers are terrible, they break easy where it rotates. I never did find a better one that would fit it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
318 or 383 in the car? Looks showroom ready. Do you belong to a car club that will have shows so others can see your work? Looking forward to see the end result of your new project.
It is a 383 2bbl, loves to cruise between 70 & 80 MPH. I have put a little over 6,000 miles on in 2-1/2 seasons. When I drive to car events people can’t believe I drove it there. It is funny when people look at the odometer which is now up to 13,000. (113,000 original) and think it is originally preserved. Goal for next summer is to drive from ND to the Mopar Nationals in Carlisle PA (1,300 miles each way). No car club but take it to local and not so local cruise nights. I like the drive more than the event.
If anyone is interested in the full story and process You can visit the thread on ForCbodies only as a guest. I will try to keep this thread on the motorcycle, but I know that threads tend to wander.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The TC and TS125 share many of the same parts as the TC & TS185. That might help with your part sourcing.

It's one of the easiest engines to work on. Second gear is a weak link, once you get it going if you are going to ride it hard, ride it hard in any gear other then second. (2nd gear is press fit onto the countershaft and can spin loose)

Your rear sprocket cushion drive failed when the rear wheel bearings went out. Original swingarm bushings are marginal to say the least, I made new ones out of bronze and it was an upgrade.

The kick start levers are terrible, they break easy where it rotates. I never did find a better one that would fit it.
Thanks
True on the kick starter, I have salted my search with little success. I have a fair amount of other things I should do before cranking over the engine.
It seems some of the parts cross years and I have learned a lot in the last week on what this is. In high school I just drove it. When it broke I would try to fix it. I had good mechanical aptitude growing up on a small farm/ranch, but the money to buy parts was limited.
T cushion failed hard and took out a couple of nubs in the hub and the blew out the snap ring groove. I found a used wheel on e- bay that is on the way. Claim from seller is that it is in good shape. This weekend I plan to make a mount for my lift table to start tearing into it.
Thanks for the tips on second gear.

68867
68868
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
First order of business is to make a support mount to secure it on my hydraulic lift table. I am getting too old to sit on m knees.
Once mounted, I need to take lots of pictures so, I can remember how it goes back together. (My car was apart 11years. Pictures were a great help). As I said in my welcome, I am very detail oriented, some call it being anal retentive. When I get into this stuff I like to try and replicate how the engineers and designers intended it to be.
Anyhow after stripping it down I need to go through the engine and re-seal it, likely the clutch pack, carb soak and rebuild, and frame repair. My kickstand mount is broken off, and my frame is broken by the left foot peg. I may need to section a donor frame (I would like to keep the original S/N stamping and tag)
68869
68870
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Are you doing an accurate restore or do you want to make it a better dirt bike?
I am not much of a dirt bike rider anymore,(or road bike for that matter) so will likely gravitate towards original. My goal is to fix what I destroyed in high school.
However I would be interested to hear what could be done to make it a better dirt bike.

In fact I have never had a motorcycle license. I bought my first bike in 7th grade (a pristine’68 Honda 125 4-stroke street bike that I rode like a dirt bike and trashed). I have always rode in our pastures, farm fields or gravel roads. I only snuck it on pavement a couple of times.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,565 Posts
Lots; you could do, lace the wheels with alloy rims, 21 inch on the front, 18 inch on rear. Goes over things better.
Right where your frame is busted, I would use that as the reason and opportunity to move the pegs rearward and a little higher and replace them with nice big modern foot pegs, those original ones were terrible.
The saddle was awful on those bikes but I never found a way to fix that.
The stock brakes can be improved a couple of ways, I put shallow cuts across the face of the brake shoe to give water to go and make them dry out a little faster. You can sand down the leading edge of the shoe to make braking a little more progressive.
Upgrade the handlebars to alloy, replace the levers with dog legs, shorten the rear brake lever to suit the peg relocation. Remove the passenger pegs, unless you're a kid it's not enough motorcycle to carry passengers anyway.
Rear shocks are easy to upgrade, there are lots of aftermarket ones that fit it and almost anything is an upgrade.
I polish the ports on them a little because when they are stock they are pretty rough.
Paper air filter I always replaced with an oiled foam aftermarket one. That was a serious good improvement for water crossings.

And most important :cool: Full Knobby Tires.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,565 Posts
Front fork springs can be upgraded to just a straight linear spring that suits your weight, the original springs are likely bagged out anyway, other then that the forks are inherently weak but there's not much you can do to fix them, the front axles is too small.

Add an inline fuel filter, the fuel tanks are prone to rust at the bottom seams right behind the fuel tap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for the tips. Will have to think about those things.
Today I pulled the engine out and started accessing what it needs. Engine turns over nicely by hand. I will finish stripping the frame and then start looking at the repairs. Enough for today.
68875
68876
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,565 Posts
You got that welded yet? you know if I was doing that I would grind a V into the damaged area and fillet weld it with nickel rod. Then I would weld a splint over that for the brackets. You're going to have to use materials that are compatible with the mild steel tube frame.

All that old weld and kickstand bracket is best ground off, that's where you need a new splint or gusset. It probably broke there from heat from all those nearby original welds making it tempered, combined with some apparent physical abuse.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
You got that welded yet? you know if I was doing that I would grind a V into the damaged area and fillet weld it with nickel rod. Then I would weld a splint over that for the brackets. You're going to have to use materials that are compatible with the mild steel tube frame.

All that old weld and kickstand bracket is best ground off, that's where you need a new splint or gusset. It probably broke there from heat from all those nearby original welds making it tempered, combined with some apparent physical abuse.
.
Slow down:giggle:! This was supposed to be my winter project when my kids leave for college.
But I do have it stripped down and all the small stuff bagged and labeled. And am ready to sort into bigger bags.
I want to get all the grease cleaned off and survey the damage, but I think you are on the right track. It looks like I already tried to do some welding on the kickstand. It looks like I used our arc welder with some of the gobs on there.
I will clean it up real good and grind off the kickstand. I think I could incorporate more support for the frame with a new one.
I need to get my solvent tank out and do some cleanup.
68882
68883
68884
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Actually the steering bearings were not too bad.
The steering seemed tight and smooth still. When I would jack it up and put it backdown again there really wasn’t any free play radial or axial. The grease was the consistency of wax though. It never really had a lot of heavy weight on it. When I owned I was between 120 and 160 Lbs.
The frame may see it differently, a lot of rough pastures close to the Missouri River breaks and bouncing over furrows in the field.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I made the mistake of adding up my parts costs so far. I need to quit doing that. But I think I have all the parts needed except kickstarter, rear fender, rear rack, chain, sprockets, tires…… Never mind the list is endless.
I did have to find a new rear swing frame as well. When my hub snap ring popped out (more than once) my left chain adjuster spun round and round wearing halfway through. Found one fo $40 with shipping. Maybe this weekend depending on how hot and muggy it is I will start looking at the frame repairs. I also need to pop a couple of dents out of the gas tank. I think it is a little too thick for painless glue stick removal. I may have to cut an access hole on the backside and dolly it out. I need to think on it a little first. Maybe air pressure? Then a dent less tool to help out. A small internal explosion could help like seating a bead, but not looking for a mishap with shrapnel
68919

68920
 

·
American Legion Rider & sub-Administrator
Joined
·
25,278 Posts
I made the mistake of adding up my parts costs so far.
That's dangerous on anything you work on. Can really ruin your day. Then add in the number of hours you've put in and, YIKES!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
That's dangerous on anything you work on. Can really ruin your day. Then add in the number of hours you've put in and, YIKES!
I know better. I have a general number in my head for what I spent on my car. I don’t want to know the truth. That doesn’t include my labor.
The only labor I tracked was my Upholstery time re building my seats, making my seat covers and installing them. It was close to 200 hours if I recall correctly. This included making patterns of my original and going from vinyl material rolls to finished product.
I am in both my car and motorcycle for the hobby aspect. I am not expecting a return on my investment. It is a great way for me to shut off work and distress.
 

·
American Legion Rider & sub-Administrator
Joined
·
25,278 Posts
Like boats, money pits, but fun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,565 Posts
Actually the steering bearings were not too bad.
The steering seemed tight and smooth still. When I would jack it up and put it backdown again there really wasn’t any free play radial or axial. The grease was the consistency of wax though. It never really had a lot of heavy weight on it. When I owned I was between 120 and 160 Lbs.
The frame may see it differently, a lot of rough pastures close to the Missouri River breaks and bouncing over furrows in the field.
Your steering head bearings are far worse then you realize. Do not under-estimate the forces on that bearing during normal operation. The stock loose ball bearing race was barely up to the task when it was brand new and now it's 47 years old, she's done and if you don't think so, take a look at the steel balls and the races they roll on under a microscope and then look at a new one.
 
1 - 20 of 46 Posts
Top