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-   -   How Much SeaFoam to use? (http://www.motorcycleforum.com/showthread.php?t=79645)

shelzmike 05-13-2008 11:21 AM

How Much SeaFoam to use?
 
Hey All -

I just got my new-to-me 73 Honda CB350 and it starts and runs okay (hard to start cold though). Anyhow, I am pretty sure that the carbs should (maybe not NEED to be) be cleaned out. I wanted to try using SeaFoam, because hey, it couldn't hurt. I want to see if I can avoid carb work as long as possible.

So, I know what it does (the SeaFoam, that is), but do not know how much I should put in for the first go-round cleaning. I am looking to put it in both my oil and gas (gas first, though to see what happens). I know that some people use a bit in each tank, but I am looking on how much to add to a 5 gallon tank for an intial clean. Thanks!

Mike

LowRiderGhost 05-13-2008 12:02 PM

After The Fact Stuff
 
You and me both Brother! :eek: Think I waited just too long to add 'Sta-Bil' to my rides this past year and now they're really cranky! :o Just bit the bullet yesterday and sent off for a couple of cans of Sea-Foam myself. The eBay vender posted "one pint treats 8-25 gallons of fuel (average 1 ounce per gallon)" on his page. So either it works or it's pull the carb(s), disassemble, and soak in Berryman Carb Cleaner overnight yet AGAIN. Been there, done that more times then I care to remember over the years, but think you have too?! ;)

Keep the Faith,
LRG :cool:

Footnote: Hmmmm, I'm thinking that year of CB350 had about a 3.2 to 3.4 gallon tank capacity. Man, "5.0" would of been great! :D

Nitelord 05-13-2008 12:03 PM

Here is a link to the Sea Foam web site. It shows the mixing process (gas application).

Read the label too. I thought that it had the info on there also. :)

03civex 05-13-2008 01:05 PM

Would put like 1/4 of it in your tank and drive around, see if you notice any improvement

shelzmike 05-13-2008 04:28 PM

I just bought 3 gallons of gas and put it into a gas can - I will add ~ 3 ounces to the container and use it that way. I will update on the outcome.

Mike

subwofer2 05-13-2008 07:49 PM

It can also be put into the air intake. The can says 1/3 of a oz. I just put 3.5oz into a full tank (3.7gals). I plan to put 3oz into my oil and ride for a hour before I change the oil next time.

Here is info about it:

http://www.seafoamsales.com/images/updates_whitecap.gif

SEA FOAM MOTOR TREATMENT for
Diesel Applications
Excellence in Performance
Cleans injectors
Adds lubricity
Anti-gel
Cleans crankcase
Restores power
Removes moisture
Cleans carbon
Stabilizes fuel
Diesel fuel conditioner
Small Engine Applications
Works and Performs Instantly
Stabilizes fuel
Cleans carburetor
Cleans carbon
Removes moisture
Assures fast starts
Frees sticky rings
Restores power
Upper cylinder lube
Smooths rough idle


How to Use SEA FOAM MOTOR TREATMENT
In Tune-Up of Diesel Engines

Fill primary fuel filter with SEA FOAM. Be sure filter is fully primed to prevent air locks. This will clean injectors quickly.
Use 1 pint of SEA FOAM to every 25 gallons of diesel fuel to add lubricity, clean fuel lines, injector pump and remove moisture.
Use 1 pint of SEA FOAM to every 4 gallons of oil to clean rings and other engine parts internally. For best results, use SEA FOAM for 1 hour before oil change. Results in cleaner engines and longer oil change intervals.

When Added to Diesel Fuel Tank

Cleans fuel injectors
De-ices and removes moisture
Cleans carbons as you drive
Diesel fuel conditioner and anti-gel
Lubricates upper cylinders
Stabilizes fuel
Adds lubricity
One pint treats 25 gallons of fuel.


For Anti-Gel and De-Icer

Use 1 pint in fuel tank to 25 gallons of diesel fuel to dry moisture and prevent gelling.
Sea Foam will degel gelled fuel. Start with one pint to 25 gallons of gelled fuel. More will be needed in extreme cold weather.
If filters are gelled, change them and fill them with SEA FOAM.

__________________________________________________ __

How to Use SEA FOAM
In Tune-Up of Small 4 Cycle Carbureted Engine Lawn Mowers, Tillers, Edgers, Snowblowers, etc.

Start engine. If engine will not start, check spark and compression. If engine has spark and compression, pour a small amount up to 1/2 ounce into the carburetor throat. SEA FOAM will act as starting fulid and will start the engine unless there is a mechanical or electrical problem. With engine warm, keep on high idle and slowly pour one ounce through carburetor throat. Make sure exhaust is well ventilated when using in the carburetor as fumes will be extreme for a short time.
Pour 1/2 ounce to one ounce into small fuel tank and oil crackcase.
Immediate Results: Same as for large 4 cycle Autos, Trucks, Tractors, etc.
NOTE: One pint treats 8-25 gallons of gas (average one ounce per gallon) or 6-12 gallons of gas oil mix (average 2 ounces per gallon.) Does not replace oil. Use frequently.

For Small 2-Cycle Engines
Use procedure 1 of tune-up of small 4 cycle carbureted engines.
Pour 1/2 to 1 ounce into small fuel tank.
See label on can for exact detailed results for use in each area Fuel Tank-Carburetor.
NOTE: SEA FOAM does not replace 2 cycle oil.

For Engine Storage
For storage, the engine should be thoroughly saturated internally with Sea Foam. Sea Foam can be injected internally through the spark plug holes or through the carburetor with ignition off.

For Fuel Stabilization
Use 1 pint to 25 gallons or (average of 1 ounce per gallon) to stabilize and condition fuels. One pint stabilizes 25 gallons of regular, unleaded and diesel fuels.
Use 1 pint to stabilize 6-12 gallons of 2 cycle (gas-oil mix) fuels (average 2 ounce per gallon).

Common Reasons Service Technicians Use SEA FOAM MOTOR TREATMENT

When your vehicle has a rough idle, hesitates, stalls, pings or has an after run problem – this is often due to carbon buildup.

Your service technician can offer a reasonably priced fuel systems cleaning with the use of SEA FOAM products to solve these carbon problems.

When your vehicle’s fuel injectors need cleaning – this is often due to residue left on injectors from poor burning fuels and contaminants.

Your service technician can offer an inline fuel injection cleaning with the use of an injector cleaning machine and SEA FOAM MOTOR TREATMENT. SEA FOAM MOTOR TREATMENT is also added to the fuel to disperse moisture, clean fuel lines and injectors while driving.

When moisture needs to be removed from fuels or an anti gel or de-icer is needed – these conditions are due to condensation in the fuel tank and extreme cold weather creating gas line freeze or diesel fuel gelling.

Your service technician can recommend the use of SEA FOAM MOTOR TREATMENT in the fuel tanks to dry moisture and cure these problems.

When there is moisture detected in the oil – this problem is due mostly to poor ventilation and condensation. Sometimes, however, there is a bad head gasket, cracked head or block that must be replaced.

Your service technician will diagnose the problem and recommend the repairs. As part of the diagnostics, a SEA FOAM MOTOR TREATMENT can be used in the oil crankcase to cure the moisture problems. A SEA FOAM MOTOR TREATMENT can also be used in the oil crankcase after repairs to make sure moisture is eliminated.

When valve lifter noise is apparent or piston rings seem to be sticking – this is often due to dirty and gummed up oil passages, varnished lifters and buildup of gum, varnish and carbon in the piston ring areas.

Your service technician can offer a SEA FOAM MOTOR TREATMENT that will clean sticky lifters and free sticky rings. By doing this treatment you will be able to determine if there is a varnish problem or a mechanical problem.

To help pass emissions tests – high emission numbers are usually caused by extreme carbon build up, dirty emission control items such as: pcv valve, egr valve, oxygen sensors or bad spark plugs and wires.

Your service technician can provide a pre-emission test service that includes SEA FOAM MOTOR TREATMENT as a cleaning agent to help pass emissions tests.

When fuel stabilization and engine fogging is needed – fuels of today become stale in less than thirty days. Therefore, stabilization and engine fogging are needed when vehicles, lawnmowers, snow blowers, outboard motors, chainsaws, motorcycles, gas in cans and engines are put into storage.

Your service technician can provide fuel stabilization and engine fogging services with SEA FOAM MOTOR TREATMENT.

KaJuN 05-13-2008 10:55 PM

I just ran some SeaFoam through my Yamaha and it made a huge difference. There's a lot more power, throttle response is much better, and she purrs like a kitten at idle. I used 1/3 in the tank, 1/3 in the intakes, and the last 1/3 in the oil. The intake method is my favorite because I get an awesome smoke show to watch. :cool:

subwofer2 05-14-2008 12:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KaJuN (Post 480347)
I just ran some SeaFoam through my Yamaha and it made a huge difference. There's a lot more power, throttle response is much better, and she purrs like a kitten at idle. I used 1/3 in the tank, 1/3 in the intakes, and the last 1/3 in the oil. The intake method is my favorite because I get an awesome smoke show to watch. :cool:

Dude! you used a 1/3 of the can in the intake? The label says 1/3 of an ounce! Have you done this in the past?

shelzmike 05-14-2008 12:22 AM

Well, I used it and it (only in the gas for now) and it IMMEDIATELY made a big difference. Starts, idles, and responds much better now. I know that many are leery of MAGICAL elixirs, but this one, regardless if it is magic or not, does make a difference. Will it mean that I never have to take it apart and clean it? I doubt it, but it should make the times in between stretch out longer. But then again, you never know!

Oh, and a newb question here - how do you go about getting it into the intakes?

Mike

Edit: Oh, and I only used about 3.5 ounces for 3 gallons of gas. Just put the gas in a can, mixed it together, and poured her in.

KaJuN 05-14-2008 11:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by subwofer2 (Post 480391)
Dude! you used a 1/3 of the can in the intake? The label says 1/3 of an ounce! Have you done this in the past?

I did multiple cleanings over a couple days just using a little bit of the stuff each time to make sure everything was out of there. It was very tedious having to do each of four carbs separate but it was well worth the effort.

subwofer2 05-14-2008 07:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KaJuN (Post 480503)
I did multiple cleanings over a couple days just using a little bit of the stuff each time to make sure everything was out of there. It was very tedious having to do each of four carbs separate but it was well worth the effort.

Can you please share how you did each carb? I was thinking I could drip it into the air intake but maybe someone could share the right way.

I have an 85 Honda Nighthawk CB650SC

KaJuN 05-14-2008 08:39 PM

The intake boots on my bike each have a vacuum fitting. I just removed the cap and poured in some Seafoam using a special homemade tool (vacuum line and a small funnel). I did one cylinder at a time and let it sit a while to make sure it got everything out. It was tedious but it worked.

03civex 05-14-2008 08:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by subwofer2 (Post 480391)
Dude! you used a 1/3 of the can in the intake? The label says 1/3 of an ounce! Have you done this in the past?

you can use as much as you want as long as you dont let it suck in so much at one time causing it to hydrolocks, otherwise no problem. Great stuff in my book ;)

libra moon 05-14-2008 10:18 PM

Hi all, Am new here and wanted to add that i have read good things on line about sea foam. Was put into the gas tank of a triumph tiger 98 that had been sitting for years. The guy let it sit for a few days then the bike ran like new. Some have called it snake oil only i don't think so. Great forum. Lots of good info.

libra moon 05-14-2008 10:22 PM

And was reading about the '73 Honda 350cb. That was my first bike in 73. Bought it brand new. It cost 800 dollars new at the time. And they are good bikes. I rode mine from Albany,NY to Miami, Florida without a hitch.

shelzmike 05-15-2008 12:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by libra moon (Post 480708)
And was reading about the '73 Honda 350cb. That was my first bike in 73. Bought it brand new. It cost 800 dollars new at the time. And they are good bikes. I rode mine from Albany,NY to Miami, Florida without a hitch.


$800 new? They have gone up in value then - $1100 blue book as of last week. I paid just about that for the one that I got, which runs (almost) like new.

Mike

subwofer2 05-15-2008 01:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KaJuN (Post 480672)
The intake boots on my bike each have a vacuum fitting. I just removed the cap and poured in some Seafoam using a special homemade tool (vacuum line and a small funnel). I did one cylinder at a time and let it sit a while to make sure it got everything out. It was tedious but it worked.

Thanks, great advice... Do you think I could just pour some into the intake? or should I look at removing the boots for each?

KaJuN 05-15-2008 02:15 AM

If you have a way of pouring it into the intake so that it reaches the cylinders then I say go for it. There's no way to do that on my bike so I had to go for the method I used.

libra moon 05-15-2008 08:05 AM

350 cb
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by shelzmike (Post 480751)
$800 new? They have gone up in value then - $1100 blue book as of last week. I paid just about that for the one that I got, which runs (almost) like new.

Mike

The old Jap bikes are the best as far as I'm concerned. Lots of parts can be found on e bay. but beware of the quality. If you need parts for it that is. When I had my maxim I found plenty of websites dedicated to the old bikes. Restoration, parts etc. Just google it.

buellosaurusrex 05-16-2008 01:31 AM

We're sorta drifting off subject here....
Back to the subject at hand.
Sea Foam.
No, I don't believe in elixirs, snake oil, additives, and such.
Yes, I use Sea Foam. Regularly. Because it works.
My Dodge Stratus has been having morning sickness the last couple of weeks, on & off. Last time this happened, we ended up with one cylinder quitting altogether and a $300.00 bill from the repair shop...for cleaning the injectors. This time, I headed the Apaches off at the pass. 1 can Sea Foam; car runs great again.
I also ran Sea Foam through a set of carbs on a customer's Venture Royale which clearly needed a carb cleaning (wouldn't idle, stumbled on acceleration). I ran the Sea Foam into the carbs and let them soak overnight. The next day I rode the bike for 3 miles and it purred like a kitten. I'm sold!

Brettchuck 05-21-2008 02:37 PM

Sea Foam is awesome stuff. B12 seems to work as well too.

super32 10-19-2008 05:38 AM

Hi all.

In regards to using SeaFoam directly sucked in via intake, it's sounds to me people are "pouring" SeaFoam in??? I hope not. I'd suggest to use some sort of mister/spray bottle. A finished/empty hairspray bottle or something of the sort would work nicey; the smaller the bottle the better to work with, since you'll not be using too much seafoam. So, when you're spraying at an angle, the spray tube will still be able to get the SeaFoam...

anyway, I haven't tried this yet, so I'm not sure of the effects :eek:
Yes, I know the "easier said than done", but I will try it very soon, like after I wake up and get some breakfast and then I'll return to report back.

LowRiderGhost 10-19-2008 09:04 AM

Sorry Folks but there's always bound to be at least one dissenter in the ranks?! I've tried Sea-Foam for about a year now, in four separate vehicles - at least for me the schitt just don't work. So instead of using this like a ton of other over priced crap out there and pouring it down the proverbial toilet (exhaust pipes) it's at least for me, back to the tried and true pay my dues method - fix the problems myself instead of depending on magic elixirs that don't work, while corporate America sits there laughing they're arses off at us. Nuff' said.

LRGhttp://www.gnomebisque.com/LowRiderGhost/old.gif

Eppy1425 10-19-2008 01:38 PM

should say on label, ive used it before....

mdonof02 10-20-2008 12:00 PM

Carbs & the "Elixir"
 
Hey, how do you guys know actually when you ought to clean your carbs? I just got my first bike & am trying to learn the subtleties of the bike, & hopefully how to fix them when they break. Anyway, she idles just fine when its not too cold, but when I'm riding I feel a lack of power almost, and the engine kind of gives a little jump or kick every now and then, and then at around 3000rpm something big jumps in & I get lots of power. Should I try the SeaFoam, or take apart/clean the carbs?

iamgumby 10-21-2008 12:46 AM

If you have something broken - Seafoam is not going to fix it. Ethanol is developing a bad reputation for causing a residue build up. Seafoam will clear out that residue. It will not reset floats, fix broken O rings, dried out gaskets, or clean out a years worth of negleted gasosnot. This spring I had some poor idling and seafoam cleared it up. Since then I run a standard treatment (two consecutive tanks) through my bike about once every 3 months as preventative maintenance.

super32 10-27-2008 06:14 PM

So, I did the Seafoam thing this past weekend. I used about 1oz of SeaFoam in each of my 2 cylinders. I was intending to use about 4oz (2oz each cyl) but the spraying was accumulating in my airbox, and I was getting sorta suspicious of whether or not this SeaFoam works through the air intake.

As for performance, I notice nothing. Nothing related to a "stronger" bike, or "smoother" idle/ride (it's a V-twin!), not much improvement in MPG either (maybe I got 1 or 2 mpg more, but not sure if this is due to change in riding? or due to SeaFoam?)

However, I must note that I did not leave the SeaFoam soaking in the cylinders for 10minutes as some have suggested. I merely warmed the engine up to operating temp (about 175F is good enough IMO), and started spraying SeaFoam into each intake port in the airbox with the RPM's at about 3k (to avoid hydrolock - ensures that engine is revving high enough and sparking fast enough to burn the SeaFoam).

by the way, i'm just beating this over and over in my head... what color smoke would you expect from the tailpipe if your "de-carburizing" your combustion chambers? IMO, I'd figure black, but white was all that came out... so I'm figuring maybe all I'm seeing is the SeaFoam being burnt... I will light a cap full of SeaFoam this weekend and see what kind of smoke is emitted (that is, if I can light it on fire!).

I will also re-do this SeaFoam thing, but this time allow it to "soak" a while after it's been sucked in...

... Work-In-Progress

kd7ctv 10-27-2008 07:17 PM

Seafoam will put out a white smoke, you can look on you-tube for videos of people doing it to their cars. I have done it to mine it makes a nice smoke screen...

super32 10-28-2008 11:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kd7ctv (Post 544220)
Seafoam will put out a white smoke, you can look on you-tube for videos of people doing it to their cars. I have done it to mine it makes a nice smoke screen...

yeah, I saw a bunch of those videos, believe me! :D
that was actually when I started wondering if those individuals doing it on YouTube were burning SeaFoam? or were they actually reducing the carbon deposits.

I'd actually like to rent a car, hopefully with little to no mileage, and test out this seafoam to see if I get the same amount of white smoke as my 1991 car that has never been SF'd.

I'd just hate to see a bunch of users of SF think that all that white smoke is necessarily a good reaction to using SF in their air intake box.

weekendrider 10-29-2008 02:00 AM

In the early 70's I worked for a gentleman that wanted ATF dribbled in his carbs once a month to decarbonize the cylinders. It will sure put put the smoke.

Jedi 06-30-2010 04:52 AM

I just bought my "new" to me bike, lol.

Its a 2005 Katana 750, from Florida.3,700 miles, one owner.
But, it runs "rough" at idle... The deliver guy told me to go get a carb job done. (I am not mechanically incline).

Looks like I will try this instead... I am glad I found this forum.

I will post if she improves in a few days.

Moat 09-27-2010 01:03 PM

I used about a quarter of a bottle for my 3 gallon tank and it worked great. Not as good as a carb clean, but it'll do until winter time.

ryans79 01-16-2013 11:11 AM

Seafoam
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by KaJuN (Post 480347)
I just ran some SeaFoam through my Yamaha and it made a huge difference. There's a lot more power, throttle response is much better, and she purrs like a kitten at idle. I used 1/3 in the tank, 1/3 in the intakes, and the last 1/3 in the oil. The intake method is my favorite because I get an awesome smoke show to watch. :cool:

Hello mate what is the model of your Yamaha Bike ?

Clear_Lake_VStar 01-29-2013 06:07 PM

Motohorseman previously posted:
Quote:

I do fill the tank and add Yamaha stabilizer, it is the best I've found and does things others don't.
http://www.yamaha-motor.com/outboard...06/detail.aspx
For more than 65 years, Sea Foam has been proven to be safe for use in all engines, both diesel and gasoline, and won’t harm gaskets, seals or other internal components of the engine, fuel system or oil system. Sea Foam is a petroleum blend with no chemical additives. Sea Foam is recommended by thousands of professional mechanics and service technicians throughout the U.S. and Canada.

Sea Foam is composed solely of three specially blended petroleum oils – each having specific functions such as lubricating, cleaning or moisture control. There are no other chemicals (not even color dyes) included in the formulation. Being of the same basic petroleum chemistry as the motor oils and gasoline you already use in your engine, Sea Foam is completely compatible with all engine components, fuels, lubricants and other additives you may have in your engine. Sea Foam will not damage gaskets or seals, and will not interact in a negative way with motor oil or fuel, or the additives used in them.

LWRider 01-30-2013 04:38 PM

Seafoam is certainly not a miracle cure, you're right. But if your bike had been running OK and then develops a bit of a stumble, sometimes just running some Seafoam through will cure it with no adverse affects. The problem comes when someone tries to use it when the carb(s) really needs a thorough rebuild/clean. Sometimes you just got to pull 'em. Now what I strive to do is keep the carbs clean enough that I don't need any regular liquid cleaning maintenance. For my 1968 bike I use Startron as a regular additive when not at home and able to get non-ethanol fuel, but only to prevent carbon buildup, to mitigate the effects of alcohol, and to increase mileage (on my 350 it ups it from 55 to 65 mpg).

Cheers,

Mike

LWRider 01-30-2013 05:39 PM

Holy crap! Mama Mia! That' s a tasty float bowl! ;)

Yep, not a job for Seafoam. lol

I've had similar and many with a chalky whitish residue, which I have assumed is aluminum oxidation from the water the alcohol has introduced via the "modern" fuel.

Back when I was getting the CB350 running I cleaned me some CV carbs so many times I could do it with my sleep in about five minutes. Now I have a pair of crispy 350As sitting and ready to go into the restoration. :) These will stay nice and clean.

Cheers,

Mike

cmonSTART 01-30-2013 10:31 PM

2 Attachment(s)
Wow, those are ugly. Here is what my current project was like:

http://i1169.photobucket.com/albums/...tart/carbs.jpg

Seafoam need not apply.


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