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post #1 of 39 (permalink) Old 04-23-2017, 09:45 AM Thread Starter
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I'm lost

Hi, I really want to buy a bike, never had one and never rode one. But I came to a conclusion to start off from a 600. But I am lost which brand should I buy. Yamaha? Honda? Ducati? .etc
I am as well tight on money. I am wondering if I should get an older year but modified, or newer year but stock? I also read somewhere if buying an R6 to buy 08 and up but they are still a bit expensive! Please help me out guys because I am lost but I really want to enjoy the bike life!


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post #2 of 39 (permalink) Old 04-23-2017, 09:53 AM Thread Starter
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I was thinking between these two,
https://seattle.craigslist.org/sno/mcy/6096576050.html
https://seattle.craigslist.org/sno/mcy/6071556974.html


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post #3 of 39 (permalink) Old 04-23-2017, 10:57 AM
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Why did you decide on an R6, rather than something more suitable for a beginner rider?

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post #4 of 39 (permalink) Old 04-23-2017, 10:59 AM Thread Starter
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Why did you decide on an R6, rather than something more suitable for a beginner rider?



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Because I will be riding for a while, and in the longer run an R6 will be more logical! And smaller cc bikes rev too much on the freeways! And that beats the engine! I am responsible so I will watch my wrist lol


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post #5 of 39 (permalink) Old 04-23-2017, 12:44 PM
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As long as you're not being over confident in doing it, if you must start on a fast bike, practice as much as you can in a safe place, so you get used to the throttle and its handling. It'll be a heavy jump for what you do your training on. Although it is a 600cc and some people do start with 600cc bikes, it's still a supersport and going to have some oomph! The typical way to go is, have your starter bike, get your road confidence and then step up to a bigger bike. And you'll find good starter bikes can have a good resale value, as often people don't do a lot of mileage on them before they upgrade and don't lose a lot of value or may even find they keep it and starter bikes are generally in good demand, but you'd need to do your research if you were to take that route. I did mine and reckon what I'd lose is outweighed by the benefits and an affordable amount.

I am not going to say "don't do it", just as long as you know what you're up against and what the advice is, you'll make your own decision. I know money can sometimes be a decider as well as the desire to jump straight to your baby, but safety is something to consider too.

With regards to recommendations, Yamaha and Honda are definitely good choices, the big Japanese bikes have a good reputation for reliability. Ducati, I don't know much about, my boss's partner rides one and loves it, I believe they used to have a reputation for being less reliable, but more hearsay, so their current bikes could be fine, but generally worth looking up. As you say you'll be riding for a long time and reliability and are considering value will be something you want. In that respect, Yamaha is good for it.
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post #6 of 39 (permalink) Old 04-23-2017, 12:50 PM Thread Starter
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As long as you're not being over confident in doing it, if you must start on a fast bike, practice as much as you can in a safe place, so you get used to the throttle and its handling. It'll be a heavy jump for what you do your training on. Although it is a 600cc and some people do start with 600cc bikes, it's still a supersport and going to have some oomph! The typical way to go is, have your starter bike, get your road confidence and then step up to a bigger bike. And you'll find good starter bikes can have a good resale value, as often people don't do a lot of mileage on them before they upgrade and don't lose a lot of value or may even find they keep it and starter bikes are generally in good demand, but you'd need to do your research if you were to take that route. I did mine and reckon what I'd lose is outweighed by the benefits and an affordable amount.



I am not going to say "don't do it", just as long as you know what you're up against and what the advice is, you'll make your own decision. I know money can sometimes be a decider as well as the desire to jump straight to your baby, but safety is something to consider too.



With regards to recommendations, Yamaha and Honda are definitely good choices, the big Japanese bikes have a good reputation for reliability. Ducati, I don't know much about, my boss's partner rides one and loves it, I believe they used to have a reputation for being less reliable, but more hearsay, so their current bikes could be fine, but generally worth looking up. As you say you'll be riding for a long time and reliability and are considering value will be something you want. In that respect, Yamaha is good for it.


Thank you for your advice! Could you give your opinion on buying a newer bike or an older bike but with modifications? I am really considering an R3 but on highways or freeways you drive at speeds 65+ and I'm wondering how they behave at those speeds, and motor reliability at high rpm' alike that!


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post #7 of 39 (permalink) Old 04-23-2017, 01:15 PM
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I am a new rider too myself...just obsessed, have the bug and observed advice from all over the place, taking it in to understand and not make too many mistakes myself and in looking at all sorts of different bikes.

So I'll be straight forward and say, my thoughts won't necessarily match the wisdom or experience of other people here. So I would probably value their opinion higher.

But as it is only an opinion. I personally prefer the idea of buying newer bikes and without modifications. My reasoning for this is that if brand new, the bike will have it's own warranty, meaning if it has problems, you're not going to need to know how to fix them yourself or pay a garage to do it for you. There are plenty of good reasons to go second hand too, but I am only speaking as somebody who prefers the benefits that come with buying new. And here in the UK, it means I don't have to MOT the bike for 3 years and in my particular case, all my gear was thrown in for free. But second hand obviously saves money and in the case of newer bikes, there are often improvements to technology, but always worth doing your research for each model. Newer doesn't always mean better. But arguably, newer and less used bikes are more likely to work without longer without intervention (but not always guaranteed_ and for me, it is meaning I am getting to learn the ins and out of maintaining my bike without much worry that I need to do anything too soon. With second hand bikes (whether newer or older), you generally cannot guarantee the history of the bike, but most of the time, people can buy sensibly with second hand bikes anyway.

With mods, personally I would find myself not buying a modded bike, even if I like it. Especially if it's a private sale. Because you are having to assume a few things a) they've installed safe mods b) they've installed legal mods, c) that the mods are suitable for the bike and c) they've installed them properly. A and B, will be easier to ascertain, but D, not so much unless you are technical enough to determine this and I would generally argue as a new rider, you may not be, but won't make the assumption. If you do buy a second hand, you may be able to get a garage to inspect it to make sure everything is working properly before you get any real use out of it. The other thing with mods, if the bike is going to be your baby and the factory build is not enough for you, then you can make the bike your own if you're going for your own mods.

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post #8 of 39 (permalink) Old 04-23-2017, 03:38 PM
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Personal experience:

My first bike its a Kawi Ninja 500r, almost stock, private sale. It has enough power to handle highway speeds, as its top speed is 110 mph. I bought it 3 years ago and I still in love of her.

If you have little/no experience with mechanics, may be will better for you to buy a new bike (warranty). Dealer will do all the maintenance fo you. If you know how to wrench, may be you prefer buy a used unmodified one and do all the maintenance by yourself, specially if you're in a tight budget. This is much more cheap than go to a shop.

I live in Mexico, so I could not tell you the value of resale in USA, but for the suggestions I've read in this and other forums, the best thing for a beginner is to stay at 500 cc or less and buy a used and cheap motorcycle, since chances are that you will fall once or twice before fully develop all the necessary skills to manage a much more powerful engine.

So, if you and your motorcycle survive the first two or three seasons, the resale value will not have fallen much and with that money plus a little more, then you can buy the motorcycle of your choice without the fear of crashing in the first corner.
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post #9 of 39 (permalink) Old 04-23-2017, 03:53 PM Thread Starter
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Thx for the advice guys I appreciate it! I didn't mean like major engine mods, something like fender eliminators or an exhaust, integrated turn signals and frame sliders, I mean all that is something I would do myself on a bike but it all cost money, feel me?


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post #10 of 39 (permalink) Old 04-23-2017, 08:19 PM
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I will use an R6 as my example, but the others are similar.

Maximum torque occurs around 11,750 revs. Maximum horsepower, around 13,000 revs. It varies a bit depending on year, but the general idea is the same. They are high reving engines. I call it the twilight zone. The novelty of having to scream the engine all the time, wears off fast.

What I am suggesting is, there is no useful power to do the job, unless you wring the snot out of these engines. In other words, not much good for street riding. Fine for the track, for which they were designed. I suggest you may have other motives for choosing this type of bike, and further that it is the wrong choice.
The death rate for these types of bikes is 4 ( four ) X ( times ) higher than other bikes.
The four major ingredients: A sport bike, a male rider under 30, which also indicates minimum experience, speed, and rider error.

I have riden a few screamers at the track. One of my current bikes makes a lot more torque and horsepower, than the 600s. It is not like I am not familiar with the power and handling.

The riding position does not lend itself to a new rider. The view around is not as good when your head is down.

Ask me the same question in 20 years, after you have proven that you have learned to ride

I suppose if you were to take up surfing, the North Shore of Oahu, would be the best place. K2 would be a good spot for a new climber.
Beethoven's 5th for a new piano player.

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post #11 of 39 (permalink) Old 04-24-2017, 02:28 AM Thread Starter
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I will use an R6 as my example, but the others are similar.



Maximum torque occurs around 11,750 revs. Maximum horsepower, around 13,000 revs. It varies a bit depending on year, but the general idea is the same. They are high reving engines. I call it the twilight zone. The novelty of having to scream the engine all the time, wears off fast.



What I am suggesting is, there is no useful power to do the job, unless you wring the snot out of these engines. In other words, not much good for street riding. Fine for the track, for which they were designed. I suggest you may have other motives for choosing this type of bike, and further that it is the wrong choice.

The death rate for these types of bikes is 4 ( four ) X ( times ) higher than other bikes.

The four major ingredients: A sport bike, a male rider under 30, which also indicates minimum experience, speed, and rider error.



I have riden a few screamers at the track. One of my current bikes makes a lot more torque and horsepower, than the 600s. It is not like I am not familiar with the power and handling.



The riding position does not lend itself to a new rider. The view around is not as good when your head is down.



Ask me the same question in 20 years, after you have proven that you have learned to ride



I suppose if you were to take up surfing, the North Shore of Oahu, would be the best place. K2 would be a good spot for a new climber.

Beethoven's 5th for a new piano player.



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What? lol I don't see your point,


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post #12 of 39 (permalink) Old 04-24-2017, 02:57 AM
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He means that going for a supersport like an R6 is going to be a much bigger risk that other bikes. In that it carries a lot of torque to handle, is not a beginner friendly riding position and is not designed for street riding and better suited for the track and that there is a higher element of risk with your choice.

Hence advice like get a better starter bike is good advice.
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post #13 of 39 (permalink) Old 04-24-2017, 03:29 AM
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I'll try a different approach. Perfect choice for someone of your caliber. Take your pick.

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post #14 of 39 (permalink) Old 04-24-2017, 04:07 AM Thread Starter
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He means that going for a supersport like an R6 is going to be a much bigger risk that other bikes. In that it carries a lot of torque to handle, is not a beginner friendly riding position and is not designed for street riding and better suited for the track and that there is a higher element of risk with your choice.



Hence advice like get a better starter bike is good advice.


How about the R3? Is that a good starter? And thx for explaining


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post #15 of 39 (permalink) Old 04-24-2017, 06:35 AM
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Best is to start on a standard type bike or cruiser, not a sport bike at all. Something with an upright, comfortable, and easy to deal with seating position. This type of bike will usually have a 2 cylinder "V twin" engine, which are very docile and easy to handle compared to the race tuned engines on the sport bikes. You can even get a pretty big engine of this type and not have issues for a beginner. A lot of people say to start with a 250, but even a 500-700 V twin is not too much for most beginners if your careful, this type of engine is all about torque, not rpm, so you can ride them gently very easily, they don't tend to get out of hand. This type of engine is 1/2 the horsepower of the sport bike engine of the same size, just for the record. But a bike like this is still quite capable for the highway, I commuted to work 72 miles each way on the interstate on for a year on a 650 Vstar so I'm speaking from experience, it easily keeps up with traffic at substantially faster than the posted 65 mph limit.

Learn to ride on a bike like that, then you will still be alive and in one piece and ready move on to whatever you want to ride in a year. I suggest buying a good used one of these bikes,a couple of years old, basically stockwith no real mods other than cosmetic stuff. There are a million of these bikes for sale, people are always upgrading, and you can usually sell one a year later for the same thing you paid for it if you shop wisely..I lost $200 on my Vstar but put 25,000 miles on it in a year, I think I did well.
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post #16 of 39 (permalink) Old 04-24-2017, 06:39 AM
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It's not wise to start learning to drive a car with a 200 mph manual shift Ferrari, you start with an automatic Honda Civic.
How's that for an example?

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What? lol I don't see your point,


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post #17 of 39 (permalink) Old 04-24-2017, 06:40 AM Thread Starter
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It's not wise to start learning to drive a car with a 200 mph manual shift Ferrari, you start with an automatic Honda Civic.

How's that for an example?


I appreciate the advice but I wasn't considering nothing except street sport bikes therefore I am looking at CBr 250 and up and the R3 really fought my eye, what are your thoughts on the R3?


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post #18 of 39 (permalink) Old 04-24-2017, 06:52 AM
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I can't honestly give an opinion, I never rode a sport bike, but a 300 is a much wiser choice than 600, if your going to learn on a sport bike then that's the size to go with.

I have nothing against sport bikes BTW, my brother had a couple and they are awesome bikes, just not what I'm looking for.
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post #19 of 39 (permalink) Old 04-24-2017, 06:55 AM Thread Starter
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I can't honestly give an opinion, I never rode a sport bike, but a 300 is a much wiser choice than 600, if your going to learn on a sport bike then that's the size to go with.



I have nothing against sport bikes BTW, my brother had a couple and they are awesome bikes, just not what I'm looking for.


Well it happens so that I am! I love the way the look and sound!


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post #20 of 39 (permalink) Old 04-24-2017, 10:45 AM
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What? lol I don't see your point,


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The fact that you do not see my point, is reason enough to not buy a bike like an R6. In a few years you will know more about bikes, and then what I said may make a bit of sense.
The 650 Suzuki V twin would be a much better choice, so would a 500 twin. There are many normal bikes to choose from.
You need to learn to ride on a normal bike designed for street use, with higher and wider bars than a sport bike.
A sport bike is not the way to learn to ride. A 250 dirt bike, riding in the dirt, is the best way to get started IMO.
Then a 250 to 500 street bikes. I ride a 400 Yamaha twin during the winter months. Why? Because in is easier to handle. It is easier to pick up if I drop it. It does not cost as much to fix after it has been dropped. ( It got hit by a car in a parking lot )
It is way way more fun to ride than a bike like an R6.

You are still not revealing what motivates you to consider an R6 type bike. Remember, many of us were also your age at some time.

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post #21 of 39 (permalink) Old 04-24-2017, 03:10 PM
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Another point I was thinking about today when riding is that mistakes will inevitably happen and as a new rider you will make more of them. An experienced rider will be able to handle them competently, but a less experienced one, might want a bike where errors of judgement are safer...and cheap enough to repair should it happen and not likely to accidentally over rev in a panic or something easier to handle in a panic. But my knowledge of racing type bikes is next to nil, so I cannot give fair comment or experience on one for that matter.

But I got into the frame of mind, my first bike is the bike I want to learn on, but the second bike is the one I want to ride. I realise going straight to the bike you want can save money, but, there are definitely affordable ways of doing this where you don't loose much money, if that. At least in the UK, Japanese starter bikes like starter Honda and Yamaha in such a demand that if you buy second hand, you're likely to get the same price or similar back. But I don't know how it is for the US (assuming you're from the US, given us non-US are a minority here)

I also understand the itch to ride the bike you want...because I am getting antsy myself, going "I want my next biiiiike, when can I get iiit!" However, our system is: you pass a course (called a CBT), you are allowed to ride upto 125cc and then when you are ready, pass your A1, A2 or Full A License (depending on your age) and then you'll be able to ride a bigger bike, A1 and A2 still have restrictions, however, A is not. So I am restricted legally to a 125 until I am competent enough to pass my full test (as I am over 24, I can jump to an A straight away). In a way, it's a good system and has reduced motorcycle accidents since having been in place. As much as I love my bike, (it is actually a really nice bike to ride, I made a good choice out of a 125), I do wish mine was more powerful for the simple reason, the acceleration and high end speed is lacking. Which is fine for riding in town, as control trumps speed & acceleration, but given I live out in the country, I have to watch people overtake me all the way into town as my bike gradually climbs to speed. :P But in the US, something like a 300 or 500 isn't going to give you that problem and still starter friendly.

Maybe if you are street riding, maybe if you do go for this approach, your first bike could be a street bike to get your confidence on the street and then find a street friendly sport/supersport for when you're ready.

Either way, you'll decide what you want to do and is best for you. But I hope any insight and opinions are helpful in making the right one.
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post #22 of 39 (permalink) Old 04-24-2017, 03:19 PM Thread Starter
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The fact that you do not see my point, is reason enough to not buy a bike like an R6. In a few years you will know more about bikes, and then what I said may make a bit of sense.

The 650 Suzuki V twin would be a much better choice, so would a 500 twin. There are many normal bikes to choose from.

You need to learn to ride on a normal bike designed for street use, with higher and wider bars than a sport bike.

A sport bike is not the way to learn to ride. A 250 dirt bike, riding in the dirt, is the best way to get started IMO.

Then a 250 to 500 street bikes. I ride a 400 Yamaha twin during the winter months. Why? Because in is easier to handle. It is easier to pick up if I drop it. It does not cost as much to fix after it has been dropped. ( It got hit by a car in a parking lot )

It is way way more fun to ride than a bike like an R6.



You are still not revealing what motivates you to consider an R6 type bike. Remember, many of us were also your age at some time.



Unkle Krusty


Yah I appreciate your opinion! Totally do because I have 0 experience! But again I'm 18 and I don't want a granny looking bike! With all do respect how old are you?


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post #23 of 39 (permalink) Old 04-24-2017, 03:29 PM Thread Starter
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Another point I was thinking about today when riding is that mistakes will inevitably happen and as a new rider you will make more of them. An experienced rider will be able to handle them competently, but a less experienced one, might want a bike where errors of judgement are safer...and cheap enough to repair should it happen and not likely to accidentally over rev in a panic or something easier to handle in a panic. But my knowledge of racing type bikes is next to nil, so I cannot give fair comment or experience on one for that matter.



But I got into the frame of mind, my first bike is the bike I want to learn on, but the second bike is the one I want to ride. I realise going straight to the bike you want can save money, but, there are definitely affordable ways of doing this where you don't loose much money, if that. At least in the UK, Japanese starter bikes like starter Honda and Yamaha in such a demand that if you buy second hand, you're likely to get the same price or similar back. But I don't know how it is for the US (assuming you're from the US, given us non-US are a minority here)



I also understand the itch to ride the bike you want...because I am getting antsy myself, going "I want my next biiiiike, when can I get iiit!" However, our system is: you pass a course (called a CBT), you are allowed to ride upto 125cc and then when you are ready, pass your A1, A2 or Full A License (depending on your age) and then you'll be able to ride a bigger bike, A1 and A2 still have restrictions, however, A is not. So I am restricted legally to a 125 until I am competent enough to pass my full test (as I am over 24, I can jump to an A straight away). In a way, it's a good system and has reduced motorcycle accidents since having been in place. As much as I love my bike, (it is actually a really nice bike to ride, I made a good choice out of a 125), I do wish mine was more powerful for the simple reason, the acceleration and high end speed is lacking. Which is fine for riding in town, as control trumps speed & acceleration, but given I live out in the country, I have to watch people overtake me all the way into town as my bike gradually climbs to speed. :P But in the US, something like a 300 or 500 isn't going to give you that problem and still starter friendly.



Maybe if you are street riding, maybe if you do go for this approach, your first bike could be a street bike to get your confidence on the street and then find a street friendly sport/supersport for when you're ready.



Either way, you'll decide what you want to do and is best for you. But I hope any insight and opinions are helpful in making the right one.


Yes man!!! It's very helpful!!! But the thing is where I live it's not a crowded city or a downtown! It's mostly neighborhoods and long streets! And I need something that can go 75mph without reving too much and from what I researched R3 or the ninja 300 should do the job and still be beginner friendly! Sorry guys you are all wise and I respect that! But with all due respect I can't see myself on a granny bike! Just can't do it!


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post #24 of 39 (permalink) Old 04-24-2017, 03:44 PM
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No worries.

I am 27. There's plenty of non-granny looking bikes (no offense the elder members of the forum :P). Most street bikes look pretty slick in my opinion. Personally, I love the look of Honda's street bikes, hence one reason I went for a CB125F, a low cc learner bike that has a bit of street cred. You'll have more cc's to play with than i did at least and there are higher cc street CB models. And looking at the US Honda website, you'll have options like the CB300F and CB500F to get higher spec versions of the same bike I ride. But a looky here: 2017 CB500F Overview - Honda Powersports

The KTM Duke is another choice people have, it's supposed to be good for handling too, but when it has come to reliability I've heard mixed things. Somebody recommended the 390 Duke to me as a bike to step up to, so I figured I'd add it, as to fair, it's not a bad looking bike. And KTM can be sporty. Yamaha, Kawasaki and Suzuki all do good looking bikes in this category in my opinion. Of course, it boils down to taste. You don't have to get a supersport to have anything that's sporty or has street cred or don't look like the cruisers, tourers or classic-styled bikes out there, which I seem to gradually get the impression dominate roads in the US? Though personally, I am jumping to a cruiser, probably a bobber like the Rebel, but again, taste, but I still love the look of street sport bikes and who knows, I may still get one, but would probably be as a second bike at a later date.



Also...as odd or daft as it may seem, if you have gaming PC or a console like PS4 or XBox One, why not pick up Ride 2 (link here)? It won't give you the feel of the bike or anything like that, as it'd be like telling a person to play Call of Duty before they join the army. But there's a good selection of bikes, mainly sports bikes (given it's a racing game), to choose from and has good examples of what kinds of choices you have out there and what kind of selection different manufacturers might have to offer.
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No worries.



I am 27. There's plenty of non-granny looking bikes (no offense the elder members of the forum :P). Most street bikes look pretty slick in my opinion. Personally, I love the look of Honda's street bikes, hence one reason I went for a CB125F, a low cc learner bike that has a bit of street cred. You'll have more cc's to play with than i did at least and there are higher cc street CB models. And looking at the US Honda website, you'll have options like the CB300F and CB500F to get higher spec versions of the same bike I ride. But a looky here: 2017 CB500F Overview - Honda Powersports



The KTM Duke is another choice people have, it's supposed to be good for handling too, but when it has come to reliability I've heard mixed things. Somebody recommended the 390 Duke to me as a bike to step up to, so I figured I'd add it, as to fair, it's not a bad looking bike. And KTM can be sporty. Yamaha, Kawasaki and Suzuki all do good looking bikes in this category in my opinion. Of course, it boils down to taste. You don't have to get a supersport to have anything that's sporty or has street cred or don't look like the cruisers, tourers or classic-styled bikes out there, which I seem to gradually get the impression dominate roads in the US? Though personally, I am jumping to a cruiser, probably a bobber like the Rebel, but again, taste, but I still love the look of street sport bikes and who knows, I may still get one, but would probably be as a second bike at a later date.







Also...as odd or daft as it may seem, if you have gaming PC or a console like PS4 or XBox One, why not pick up Ride 2 (link here)? It won't give you the feel of the bike or anything like that, as it'd be like telling a person to play Call of Duty before they join the army. But there's a good selection of bikes, mainly sports bikes (given it's a racing game), to choose from and has good examples of what kinds of choices you have out there and what kind of selection different manufacturers might have to offer.


Thanks for the feedback cudi! I am probably gonna go with the R3 I can get a 2015 model for about 3k and I will have room to fit into my 5k budget for gear! Gear is expensive I heard!


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post #26 of 39 (permalink) Old 04-24-2017, 04:34 PM
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BB. You made me smile with your question. I will be 71 in July this year. The photo at left was taken about 1962. That is my BSA 650.

The KTM Duke 390 is a bike I would like to have. I prefer light weight sport bikes.
However today I was riding my 1979 XS11. It weighs 555 pounds, and is about the limit of what I am prepared to ride, weight wise.
1100 cc and 95 horsepower. They were the fastest street bike back in 78 / 79, so lots of them in the dead bike yards.
I raced for many years on 250 cc Yamaha 2 strokes. They weighed about 220 pounds, and were designed and built specifically for track use.
A TD2B. I also rode many other bikes at the track.
Started as a junior on a 250 production bike, and moved up from there.

My summer bike is an SV1000 Suzuki. There is info online about the different bikes.

Sometimes on line the younger guys do not like to talk too much to older guys like me. It is always easier to talk face to face.
However, when I am at the track, this is not the case. I am fairly well known to the WMRRA ( Washington Motorcycle Road Race Association ) riders. A bit of research on your part for the year 1974 would reveal who I am. Frankie,s name appears in 1975.

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post #27 of 39 (permalink) Old 04-24-2017, 05:35 PM
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Here's a good question to ask yourself:

Should a person who wants to learn to juggle but knows nothing about juggling or how dangerous chainsaws can be, start learning by juggling chainsaws?

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BB. You made me smile with your question. I will be 71 in July this year. The photo at left was taken about 1962. That is my BSA 650.



The KTM Duke 390 is a bike I would like to have. I prefer light weight sport bikes.

However today I was riding my 1979 XS11. It weighs 555 pounds, and is about the limit of what I am prepared to ride, weight wise.

1100 cc and 95 horsepower. They were the fastest street bike back in 78 / 79, so lots of them in the dead bike yards.

I raced for many years on 250 cc Yamaha 2 strokes. They weighed about 220 pounds, and were designed and built specifically for track use.

A TD2B. I also rode many other bikes at the track.

Started as a junior on a 250 production bike, and moved up from there.



My summer bike is an SV1000 Suzuki. There is info online about the different bikes.



Sometimes on line the younger guys do not like to talk too much to older guys like me. It is always easier to talk face to face.

However, when I am at the track, this is not the case. I am fairly well known to the WMRRA ( Washington Motorcycle Road Race Association ) riders. A bit of research on your part for the year 1974 would reveal who I am. Frankie,s name appears in 1975.



Unkle Krusty


I respect you Uncle Krusty and I appreciate your advice! And it is amazing that you are 71 years young and still ride! That's true passion to the motorcycles! I did look into the duke 390 it was actually my first choice! But after some research it showed to be unreliable! So I scratched it off my list! It's not that I don't want to listen to your advice, I just want a sporty modern looking bike and R3 touched my heart, therefore I am most likely to get it!


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post #29 of 39 (permalink) Old 04-24-2017, 11:40 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks all for the support and advice! Appreciate it!


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post #30 of 39 (permalink) Old 04-24-2017, 11:41 PM Thread Starter
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Here's a good question to ask yourself:



Should a person who wants to learn to juggle but knows nothing about juggling or how dangerous chainsaws can be, start learning by juggling chainsaws?


Yes but what if I'm learning how to juggle chainsaws? And I want to buy the best chainsaw!


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post #31 of 39 (permalink) Old 04-25-2017, 03:16 AM
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Yes but what if I'm learning how to juggle chainsaws? And I want to buy the best chainsaw!
Nothing could possibly go wrong there.
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post #32 of 39 (permalink) Old 04-25-2017, 03:19 AM Thread Starter
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Nothing could possibly go wrong there.


Hahha how long did it take u to find that picture 🤣 no but for real man it's just an R3


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post #33 of 39 (permalink) Old 04-25-2017, 03:20 AM Thread Starter
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Hahha how long did it take u to find that picture 🤣 no but for real man it's just an R3


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Thx to everyone who gave me their insight on thing I think that this topic can now be closed!


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post #34 of 39 (permalink) Old 04-25-2017, 05:50 AM
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There's another angle to consider (very safely of course).

Baby the bike, ride it slow, learn the machine, understand how it acts in a turn, a curve,
steering while braking, etc. Many people own Corvettes and only cruise them around slowly.
Read the manual, learn the machine, learn to ride it and always be willing to learn more.

Only one man's opinion is to get the bike you want and not be second guessing your choice
later down the road. This makes the number one project SAFETY! MUCH low speed
practice, Sunday morning rides when no traffic is out, doing circles and figure 8's at an empty
parking lot. (Hobby Lobby and factories are generally closed Sundays leaving a safe practice area.)

Anyone who can drive a stick shift and ride a bicycle can in theory get on a motorcycle and ride it.
(I'd guess you can do that already.) The next step is to learn by experience. Please gather that
experience in a very gradual manner, be gentle of throttle, and begin to enjoy the most fun thing
to do with your clothes on. I learned on a dirtbike as a teen, but my first street bike was a 500 lb
CB750. It went 130 mph, but I never did. I rode it like a heavy moped nearly a full summer
before starting to increase lean angles and going past 1/4 throttle.

I feel that riding a fast bike in a slow manner is a great way to learn and sharpen skills. Treat that 600
like a 250cc and go get some bug juice in your teeth. LOL With the forward riding position of the sportbikes
it will take some extra concentration to remember to sit up straight and be constantly looking around.

Summary: Go slow, pay attention, learn slowly, wear safety gear, ride slowly, learn to look up and ahead rather than
staring at the ground or instrument cluster, ride slowly while practicing, and buy the bike you want so you can
ride slow and learn how to stay alive out there. Did I mention to ride slowly and learn your machine? LOL

Have fun whatever you decide to ride,
CheapMark
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post #35 of 39 (permalink) Old 04-25-2017, 02:14 PM
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Well I am a grandfather so I guess my bikes fit my persona


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There's another angle to consider (very safely of course).



Baby the bike, ride it slow, learn the machine, understand how it acts in a turn, a curve,

steering while braking, etc. Many people own Corvettes and only cruise them around slowly.

Read the manual, learn the machine, learn to ride it and always be willing to learn more.



Only one man's opinion is to get the bike you want and not be second guessing your choice

later down the road. This makes the number one project SAFETY! MUCH low speed

practice, Sunday morning rides when no traffic is out, doing circles and figure 8's at an empty

parking lot. (Hobby Lobby and factories are generally closed Sundays leaving a safe practice area.)



Anyone who can drive a stick shift and ride a bicycle can in theory get on a motorcycle and ride it.

(I'd guess you can do that already.) The next step is to learn by experience. Please gather that

experience in a very gradual manner, be gentle of throttle, and begin to enjoy the most fun thing

to do with your clothes on. I learned on a dirtbike as a teen, but my first street bike was a 500 lb

CB750. It went 130 mph, but I never did. I rode it like a heavy moped nearly a full summer

before starting to increase lean angles and going past 1/4 throttle.



I feel that riding a fast bike in a slow manner is a great way to learn and sharpen skills. Treat that 600

like a 250cc and go get some bug juice in your teeth. LOL With the forward riding position of the sportbikes

it will take some extra concentration to remember to sit up straight and be constantly looking around.



Summary: Go slow, pay attention, learn slowly, wear safety gear, ride slowly, learn to look up and ahead rather than

staring at the ground or instrument cluster, ride slowly while practicing, and buy the bike you want so you can

ride slow and learn how to stay alive out there. Did I mention to ride slowly and learn your machine? LOL



Have fun whatever you decide to ride,

CheapMark


Thank you very much!! I will have fun! And I decided on the Yamaha R3!


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post #37 of 39 (permalink) Old 04-27-2017, 10:01 AM
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Big Blunt, I'll weigh in here, too.

Back in 1990 while getting my first motorcycle endorsement, there was another guy (we were both roughly 19-20 years old), we had to perform a number of maneuvers for the state trooper to watch. I was on a Honda Magna (cruiser) and he was on a Suzuki GSX-R 600. He dropped his bike three times. I passed without incident, he failed. We never exceeded 15mph during the test.

What happened to him? The short wheelbase, track-oriented handling and power of his bike coupled with his lack of skill meant he could not maneuver in street style riding. An R6 is as unforgiving as his bike was.

Just look around at all the sport bikes owned by young guys (under 30) and see how many have never been dropped.

If you insist on a sport bike, you should understand the handling characteristics. Look at the rake/trail on the R3 vs the R6. That 1 degree angle makes a huge difference for you as a new rider. There are other factors as well.

Ask yourself how it's going to feel when you drop that expensive bike and damage it. And it's going to happen. You won't find a single seasoned rider here who hasn't dropped.

Personally, I don't care which bike you choose, just be safe, know what you're getting into and learn, learn, learn!

Let's play bikes!
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post #38 of 39 (permalink) Old 04-27-2017, 12:56 PM
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From what I read of your responses. Maybe you should post your name so when we see it in the obits, we can send a little prayer your way.
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post #39 of 39 (permalink) Old 04-27-2017, 04:08 PM
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The R3 will be a good starter bike for you. It's capabilities will well exceed yours for quite some time. Have fun out there, and be safe...
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