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post #1 of 27 (permalink) Old 05-30-2016, 01:17 PM Thread Starter
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Is this an ok first bike?

So first of all my inseam is 30' but so Im getting ready to take permit test and will take licence course rather than just a road test
Either way I am beyond sure of how I want to ride and after a lot of research and looking around (not for sometimes within a year) but the bike I really want (primarily for the riding position, style, mpg and the fact that the back part of the seat is flat which i like) is the 2012 triumph bonneville t100
So i want to know what i should consider as i get it, if its alright to get and like things that i should pay extra attention to in the process.

Last addition is that I want a bike i can use all year round ( knowing that it will take some work on/with)
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post #2 of 27 (permalink) Old 05-30-2016, 01:32 PM
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The local weather will determine if you can ride all year, and your personal comfort with it.

The Bonneville is a good motorcycle, and shouldn't be difficult for most newer riders to ride.

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post #3 of 27 (permalink) Old 05-30-2016, 02:29 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks and im in Massachusetts , think the conditions in this part of the U.S suits all year riding?
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post #4 of 27 (permalink) Old 05-30-2016, 04:06 PM
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The Bonneville would make a great first bike. Plenty of power, very reliable, comfortable and lots of accessories and mods that can be done with it. I had a 2013 mag wheel Bonneville that shared the garage with my other bike, a 2013 Trophy SE that I use for long distance riding. The mag wheel version has a little lower seat than the T100, it also uses tubeless tires. It handles the twisties a little better because of the smaller front wheel, and the front being lower to the ground. But, the T100 has that more desirable classic look with the larger spoke wheels. Either way you couldn't go wrong with either machine. I used mine for local around town riding. The downside is that there's not much wind protection, so high speed interstate travel would be brutal. I ended up selling the Bonneville and replacing it with a 4th generation Thunderbird, one more cylinder and a little larger, so it fit my size a little better.


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post #5 of 27 (permalink) Old 05-30-2016, 05:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clubz View Post
Thanks and im in Massachusetts , think the conditions in this part of the U.S suits all year riding?
That's really up to you. Riding in the rain or much below 45-50 degrees just isn't my cup of coffee. I just don't feel like bulking up with too many layers or heated gear, etc, but your mileage may vary. My bike also just does not like starting and running in the cold but I'll still take it for a loop around the neighborhood every few days this winter.

Around DC we have breaks where it's not so cold so I don't want to "winterize" it but you may not want to bother from Thanksgiving to Easter. Look up the NOAA windchill charts and see how you might feel at speed.
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post #6 of 27 (permalink) Old 05-30-2016, 05:08 PM
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Thanks and im in Massachusetts , think the conditions in this part of the U.S suits all year riding?
I don't ride in the snow or ice. I don't feel safe enough to do that, since you really depend on traction in order to do things like turn or stop effectively.

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post #7 of 27 (permalink) Old 05-30-2016, 09:43 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for that, ill definitly take a look at that chart and start paying a lot more attention to the whether, im glad its not like an outright bad idea though
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post #8 of 27 (permalink) Old 05-30-2016, 09:45 PM
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I ride in cold weather but snow and ice stop me. If there is no snow and ice I can and do ride down to about 20ºF, but no colder. I can't keep my hands warm below that temperature.


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post #9 of 27 (permalink) Old 05-30-2016, 11:22 PM
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I would take the course before getting too serious about a bike. It will give you a safe environment to test your skills to see if you like it. Some do not, but your outlook may change after the course. I wanted a bigger bike too, but after finishing the class, decided a smaller bike was the right for me. That's not too say that's the only answer.

Fit is also very important on a bike, so if you want the Bonneville, you might want to go to a dealer and sit on one. A bike you like may not fit well.

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post #10 of 27 (permalink) Old 05-30-2016, 11:30 PM Thread Starter
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Thats a great idea , i definitly am not buying before the course and yeah ill see how it feels
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post #11 of 27 (permalink) Old 05-31-2016, 07:48 AM
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It depends on you, and the Winter.

I live in NE Pennsylvania in the Pocono Mountains which is pretty much the same climate as much of Mass, this year I was able to ride all winter, though there were some stretches of a week or two when I didn't ride or didn't ride much because of the weather. Other years there is just too much snow on the roads to even consider it at times. So you CAN usually ride all year, but not every day.

It's all about setting safe limits, here are some of mine;

Cold and dry is ok, with proper clothing and electric gloves I found I am comfortable on the highway down to around 25 degrees, but I won't ride far if it's wet and around freezing, motorcycles don't do well on ice or snow and I'd hate to hit black ice on the interstate at 4am going over a mountain on the way to work!

Warm and wet is OK, I ride in the rain to work (not for fun usually, because it takes some of the joy away) but I don't like riding in the rain in the dark because it's hard to see, so I don't usually leave for work on the bike if it's raining but I don't worry much if it's going to be raining on the way home.

Other folks don't ride below 40 or 50 degrees, or if it's cloudy, or rainy, or if it's hot, it's all personal choice.

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Originally Posted by Clubz View Post
Thanks and im in Massachusetts , think the conditions in this part of the U.S suits all year riding?
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post #12 of 27 (permalink) Old 05-31-2016, 03:04 PM
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Below about 40 degrees is too cold for me! Once it hits 55 degrees or maybe a little lower I'll use the jacket's rain/wind liner and possibly the thermal liner too if I'm going on the highway. Mid to high 80's gets warm, especially all geared up, but I will ride in those higher temps and put up with the heat. Once you're moving it tends to make it bearable, especially if you're constantly moving. The three season mesh jackets work well for spring/summer/winter as advertised. My onlybadvice there is to look for one where the thermal liner has sleeves(not just a vest), not all of them do.

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post #13 of 27 (permalink) Old 06-12-2016, 03:33 AM
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I'll ride in the rain and I'll ride in the cold BUT I will not ride in a cold rain.

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post #14 of 27 (permalink) Old 08-09-2016, 12:49 PM
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Really? A Bonneville is a good "first" bike? Isn't it kind of heavy and powerful for someone new? Just asking seriously as I'm also new, also like the Bonneville, but keep seeing everywhere to go for 300cc bike to start
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post #15 of 27 (permalink) Old 08-09-2016, 01:27 PM
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A Triumph of that year is an 865cc with around fifty or so HP at the rear wheel, not too much for a beginner, they weigh somewhere just above 500 Lbs., not that heavy for a beginner, but then inseam doesn't tell whether the OP would be able to handle it. As for cold weather riding, that is a personal choice, mine is to stop riding when it goes down to around sixty or so, but ice and snow seems a little too dangerous.
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post #16 of 27 (permalink) Old 08-09-2016, 01:34 PM
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That's interesting because I'm looking at the Triumph Street Twin

http://www.munroemotors.com/default....=xNewInventory

which is one of those, "I like this bike but is it too much for a beginner" (money not an issue here). It's 900cc with like 58 hp, but as I said, I'm a beginner so I feel like I should be learning on a Rebel 250 or a s40
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post #17 of 27 (permalink) Old 08-09-2016, 09:42 PM
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Any of the Triumph Bonneville models except the new T120s or Thruxtons are not very intimidating for new riders but are good enough to keep a more experienced rider interested.
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post #18 of 27 (permalink) Old 08-09-2016, 11:33 PM
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post #19 of 27 (permalink) Old 08-10-2016, 01:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twiggidy View Post
Really? A Bonneville is a good "first" bike? Isn't it kind of heavy and powerful for someone new? Just asking seriously as I'm also new, also like the Bonneville, but keep seeing everywhere to go for 300cc bike to start
Staying around a 300 for a beginner is good advice if you're considering a crotch rocket. Cruisers and Sport Cruisers are geared different. I would consider 750 to 900 a good starter bike. Weight is more important I think. A bike will only go as fast as you twist it, but a bike that is too heavy for the rider to control is very dangerous, especially with no prior riding experience.


I personally love the look of the Bonneville and seriously considered buying one, until I sat on one. They are just not that comfortable to me. But everyone is different. That's why there is such a large market for aftermarket to change the stance, seat, and feel. Find what is comfortable. If you're unsure, check into renting a bike you think you like for a day. Test it out. Check into options to change the handlebars, foot peg location/style, fairings, etc.
Other things to consider is where you are riding. Is this a commuter? That flat seat is not good for long 500+ mile rides. Do you need luggage options? Passenger? Weigh all the options well before shelling out the clams.
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post #20 of 27 (permalink) Old 08-10-2016, 01:16 AM
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i likely don't need luggage options and i'll probably not be confident enough for a passenger for quite a bit. i enjoy sportiness but also want to be comfortable for the possibility of a long coastal ride.
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post #21 of 27 (permalink) Old 08-10-2016, 10:09 AM
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Originally Posted by theshadow619 View Post
Staying around a 300 for a beginner is good advice if you're considering a crotch rocket. Cruisers and Sport Cruisers are geared different. I would consider 750 to 900 a good starter bike. Weight is more important I think. A bike will only go as fast as you twist it, but a bike that is too heavy for the rider to control is very dangerous, especially with no prior riding experience.

Can you go into that part a bit more. If you want to PM me that's cool
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post #22 of 27 (permalink) Old 08-10-2016, 10:08 PM
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Quote:
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Can you go into that part a bit more. If you want to PM me that's cool
I don't understand exactly what more you want to know when you say go into it a bit more, but...

Crotch rockets transmissions have shorter gears for torque and high speed. The engines usually have a higher redline also. A smaller engine will still have lots of torque to the rear wheel because of engine rev and gearing.
Cruisers and sport cruisers are usually a bigger engine with more hp, with the transmission having longer gears built more for hauling weight (i.e. luggage, passengers) and cruising speeds. The larger engines also do not usually rev as high.
That's why most crotch rocket engine range from 300-900 cc, while most cruisers range 600-2000 cc.
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post #23 of 27 (permalink) Old 08-10-2016, 10:13 PM
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I always thought that crotch rockets were geared higher and developed their power in the upper RPM ranges. More HP than torque.

Cruisers on the other hand are geared lower and run more torque than HP. Torque gets you to 5250 RPM and then HP takes over.


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post #24 of 27 (permalink) Old 08-10-2016, 10:15 PM
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sorry. still new around here and trying to understand some of these engine mechanics, but that explanation made things make more sense
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post #25 of 27 (permalink) Old 08-10-2016, 11:28 PM
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I always thought that crotch rockets were geared higher and developed their power in the upper RPM ranges. More HP than torque.

Cruisers on the other hand are geared lower and run more torque than HP. Torque gets you to 5250 RPM and then HP takes over.
You are correct. Sorry, I had that backward.
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post #26 of 27 (permalink) Old 08-12-2016, 10:36 PM
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Sport bikes tend to be high revving high HP and poor torque bikes. With a twitchy throttle they come on fast and can get a new rider in trouble in a hurry. That heavy a$$ed bike I ride will simply not do that. It is heavy enough that no amount of throttle will stand it on its back wheel so at least that much control will be maintained. The power of a Triumph is more like the power on my heavy touring bike.

Heavy bikes are a pain until you have the experience because they really are too heavy for you to recover the way you might with a bicycle by putting a foot down. If you put a foot down to catch my heavy bike you will tear up your foot, not recover control. A light weight 500 pound bike is easier to control when you are having trouble controlling things than my 900 pound beast.


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post #27 of 27 (permalink) Old 08-13-2016, 05:33 AM
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