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post #1 of 64 (permalink) Old 12-22-2016, 04:23 PM Thread Starter
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Talking After decades of wanting, I'm getting :)

Hey there everyone, so in the spring I am going to get my first bike. I have wanted one my whole life but my responsible side, and my wife have postponed this and now I'm 43 and the waiting is over, it's just time to stop not living life as I dream to. I rode a some as a kid, Honda trail bikes that were my grandfathers when I was about 12-15 but haven't ridden since then. So I have been reading a lot, trying to learn and prepare, and be thoughtful about jumping into the world of riding... I am SUPER excited! So my plan is to take the riding course in the spring and then go test ride the bikes that I am interested in and then buy one. Most likely I will be buying used, and I have a bunch of questions for you all, sorry if some of these are dumb, but I am going to ask them anyway...k?

I don't plan on taking long cross country road trips, I would like to avoid the highway and spend my time on the back roads, and specifically the mountains in Colorado summers. My wife (who has not been a fan of this idea but just recently we are coming to a new understanding about what I need in my life and so has decided to be or act ok with this whole thing has asked that the bike have a passenger seat so she can ride with me (so this got me thinking away from the HD Sportster or Iron 883)

1. I know I want a cruiser but am struggling to decide which I should be MORE focused on. I know that the BIGGEST factor in my decision should be (and will be) how it feels to ride each of these. But I wanted to tell you all my list so that you could tell me if there is a bad option that I should forget, or if there is a particularly good option, or whatever... so here are the bikes I really like in no particular order:

HD Slim
HD Fat Boy
HD Breakout
Honda Fury
Victory Highball
Vicory Vegas 8-Ball
Indian Dark Horse

I don't know if any of those are "too much" bike for a newbie or not, I am 6 foot and 185 lbs. The truth is that the dark horse is so new that I won't be able to find it used for my price range anyway (I would like to keep under $10K)

Here are more questions on my mind...
2. The Heartland conversion that I see on a fair number of HDs. Sure looks cool, is the wide tire in the back a good or bad idea for a new rider? I understand it makes the bike less nimble for turning, the big tire wanting to stay up and straight... true?

3. Ape hangers (they are stock on the Highball) is that a bad idea for a new rider? and how prevelant is the problem of hands going numb on those? I have felt that from time to time as I mountain bike on single tracks and while I don't think I have any particular issue with that kind of thing it got me wondering. I am in pretty good shape actually, not amazing, but pretty good.

4. Getting drowsy while riding? Is this the same as it is in a car?

5. I don't have any friends that ride, and while I am ok with riding alone (and it sounds like lots of riders prefer this) I wouldn't mind finding a friend or two to ride with. Shootin the sh!t with on any an all topics as we explore the world around. How would I go about developing that? I love to chat about the meaningful things of life, and I don't get all worked up about it, I love to hear about people and their stories and why they believe the things they do, that's just good stuff when emotions can be kept out of it (I know that can be hard to come by, but it's awesome when it's found)

6. HD vs. the world --- I know at the end of the day, it's my bike and if I love it, that's all that matters, but as much as I do really like those non-HD bikes, I have a hard time shaking the myth and legend of HD and so... I guess I don't have a specific question about this... but opinions welcome... even if I love a non-HD bike, will I always wish it were a HD? I know you can't answer that for me...

7. Reliability of HDs --- I understand the older HDs have a lot of maintenance issues but that at some point the quality control at HD took a big step forward. Is that true? What year was that? Even with that improvement by HD, are there still significant issues? jamesrussellpublishing.biz/beforeyoubuyharley.html Before You Buy Harley I found this article and it seemed pretty well informed, is it? Do I have to count on the HD engine failing at some point?

I'm pretty sure I have some other questions too, but I am going to call that good for now and hear what you all have to say... thanks for sharing your knowledge and experience.
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post #2 of 64 (permalink) Old 12-22-2016, 05:11 PM
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Welcome aboard. I didn't get my license until I turned 39. At the time I literally hadn't even ridden on one my entire life before that. Passed the written exam first try, past the riding test first try as well. Very determined now at 42, have an 08 Suzuki S40 (650cc) in the garage I'm hoping to get even minimal.ride time in this weekend if the roads stay clear and dry up some from the recent snow and ice. Husband doesn't ride, doesn't like the idea but he will just have to manage . Riding is an integral part of my soul. You'll see that once you take your first bike out for a ride and start to enjoy it. I'd just caution getting too much engine on the first bike-lots of power you need lots of control and have to watch that throttle. Some of the bikes are very touchy and take off quicker than others.

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post #3 of 64 (permalink) Old 12-22-2016, 08:04 PM
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Okay let's try and answer your questions.

First, all the bikes you listed are too much for MOST beginers and expensive bikes to drop (you will drop your first bike) I started back after 25 years away on a VStar 650. Light enough to control and fast enough for the highway if I needed to go out on one. I would look for something in that range and once you are comfortable you in all situations you could upgrade to one of your original choices.

2 and 3. Any modifications to a bike changes the handleing of a bike. Learn to ride first and get good at it before you make changes.

4. You will be stopping more often on a bike than in a car. Most bikes are good for 2-3 hours before you need gas, your butt may require more frequent stops. If you start feeling drowsy get off the bike and walk around.

5. There are sites such as meetup that have rider groups. But I would mostly ride alone until you are comfortable with your bike and riding style. Read everything you can and watch all of Capt Crash's videos.

6 & 7. There is always time up upgrade to that HD you really want once you feel as one with what you are riding as your first bike. All manufactures are producing quality bikes. Most non HD's will cost you a lot less and are good starter bikes.

So to wrap it up. Start with something smaller that is more manageable and you won't be devastated if or when you drop it. Ride that bike solo for several thousand miles. Practice what you learned in class every time you are on the bike. Once you are fully comfortable with the bike you can think of taking the wife on the back, but for both of your sakes don't rush it. Nothing proves her mistrust more than you dropping the bike with her one it.

All of the above is my opinion. Others may disagree. You will have to decide what is best for you.


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post #4 of 64 (permalink) Old 12-22-2016, 10:17 PM
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Started riding 3 years ago at 46. Inherited a big @ss HD Road King from my father. It's my first bike and I'm still riding it. However, on my wish list is a lighter, easier to handle, beater bike that I can handle more like a bicycle and not worry about dropping it. I did learn to ride on the 750 lb. HD but I don't recommend it for that simple fact....it's just plain heavy.

And, oh yeah, Critter's right. No passengers in the beginning. Get really comfortable with the bike first. Make sure you can handle it in all situations before taking a passenger. They COMPLETELY change the way the bike feels and handles. Especially at a stop and at slow speeds.


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post #5 of 64 (permalink) Old 12-22-2016, 10:45 PM
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I agree with everything Critter says!! Take the BRC 1st because it will teach you the basics of riding and help you decide if you even want to do this. I know it sounds crazy but there are some who decide riding really isn't for them. Sadly it's after spending thousands of dollars. That is one of the reasons you find so many low mileage bikes that are only a few years old on the market.

Now, from a female rider, ask your wife to take the BRC with you. That will teach her about riding and make her a better passenger when you're ready. Also, she may want to take that beginner bike over when you move up. My husband and I both ride. I will ride behind him on long trips but locally I prefer to ride my own.

As for which bike to start on, go to dealers and sit on as many bikes as you can. You will find one that just feels right. Good Luck and have fun.
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post #6 of 64 (permalink) Old 12-23-2016, 04:01 AM
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Sure, you CAN just jump in and start riding. But time and time again with those that will admit it they will say they wish they had started with a smaller bike. And that's from those that survived. Naturally we never hear back from those that didn't. Those first few months will have times where panic wins out over skill and logic. What you do in panic mode means everything. And that's where a smaller bike to learn on means everything. They are more forgiving because if you get the right one the throttle response isn't going to get you in more trouble. But you can do it your way or listen to others and go slow and easy. Learn to ride another day instead of riding one final day. It's not like driving a car. But it is after all your choice. Read Critters post. Good information there.

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post #7 of 64 (permalink) Old 12-23-2016, 12:32 PM Thread Starter
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Excellent! Love the feedback and guidance, thank you. I will definately be taking the BRC, and I have been watching the Ride Like a Pro vids on YouTube, and I will check out the Capt Crash's videos. So about the smaller bike, what about an Indian Scout, would that be considered smaller-enough? Or a HD sportster or iron? are are those still big?

and got it... no passengers in the beginning,

I really do want to be super safe and smart about this.
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post #8 of 64 (permalink) Old 12-23-2016, 01:22 PM Thread Starter
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Or how about a Honda Shadow?
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post #9 of 64 (permalink) Old 12-23-2016, 01:25 PM
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Sportsters are fairly heavy, but have predictable throttle and braking. Personally, I would wait until after the BRC to finalize a decision. If you find the BRC fairly easy, a Sportster might work out fine. If there are parts, especially in the slow-speed maneuvering that can use a bit more practice, something lighter may be the best way to start and get some seat time on.

Take a thorough, honest assessment of where you are after the BRC. It will all come with practice and some determination and there is no hurry.

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post #10 of 64 (permalink) Old 12-23-2016, 03:03 PM
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Lots of good advice in this thread. I would follow dod's words and take BRC before really thinking about which bike to get. And don't hesitate to take the BRC more than once until you feel comfortable. I have taken it once a year since I started riding just because you will probably never practice at such low speeds otherwise.
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post #11 of 64 (permalink) Old 12-23-2016, 06:10 PM
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Quote:
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Or how about a Honda Shadow?
That is a good starter bike.
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post #12 of 64 (permalink) Old 12-24-2016, 04:28 AM
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That is a good starter bike.
Agreed.

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post #13 of 64 (permalink) Old 12-24-2016, 04:54 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks everyone. Yes, I won't be making my bike decision till after the BRC.

Another question, ear protection? I want to protect my hearing, with the wind noise, bike noise, traffic noise, etc. is it common practice to wear ear buds or something to protect the ears? Or is that stupid for safety reasons, I imagine hearing what is going on around you is pretty critical for safety. I also imagine some like to listen to music while riding (I would too), but at the cost of safety? What are the thoughts on this?
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post #14 of 64 (permalink) Old 12-24-2016, 06:12 AM
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Wearing hearing protection is a good idea. Especially when doing highway speeds.

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post #15 of 64 (permalink) Old 12-24-2016, 09:08 AM
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Thanks everyone. Yes, I won't be making my bike decision till after the BRC.

Another question, ear protection? I want to protect my hearing, with the wind noise, bike noise, traffic noise, etc. is it common practice to wear ear buds or something to protect the ears? Or is that stupid for safety reasons, I imagine hearing what is going on around you is pretty critical for safety. I also imagine some like to listen to music while riding (I would too), but at the cost of safety? What are the thoughts on this?
Get yourself some custom made ear plugs. Cost a little(lot) more but the all day comfort protection is worth every dollar. My 3rd job required them or you were fired. So I learned early on to get them adjusted for that all day run. Just a bit of filing here and there makes a world of difference. Whoever makes them can get them just right. But you have to let them do their thing to make it work.

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post #16 of 64 (permalink) Old 12-24-2016, 12:56 PM
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I see 5 to 6 year old Honda shadow cruisers, with lots of accessories, clean as a whistle, with very low miles for anywhere from $2,500 to $4,000 on Craigslist.

They make a great little bike because they are unintimidating to a new or even experienced rider.

If you buy one you can ride it until you feel ready for a bigger and more expensive bike and you will lose very little money.

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post #17 of 64 (permalink) Old 01-04-2017, 04:00 PM Thread Starter
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K, can I ask another potentially stupid question... thanks... so regarding helmets, so clearly a FF is safest way to go, and I do want to be safe, but here is my question... one of the joys of riding that I am looking forward to and hear about is not "being in the steel cage" of the car, but rather being out in the open, one with the world you are riding through, etc. (remember I don't have my bike yet so I really don't have a clue yet as to what I am talking about) but it 'seems' to me that when you put a FF on with the visor down, that you're kinda back in a box, behind glass again... no?

Maybe it's just as simple as "safety trumps" and that's that...

Maybe I just need to wait till I experience this when winter is over and I am done with the BRC and actually getting some ride time in... but I'd like to hear your thoughts on this.
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post #18 of 64 (permalink) Old 01-04-2017, 04:17 PM
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K, can I ask another potentially stupid question... thanks... so regarding helmets, so clearly a FF is safest way to go, and I do want to be safe, but here is my question... one of the joys of riding that I am looking forward to and hear about is not "being in the steel cage" of the car, but rather being out in the open, one with the world you are riding through, etc. (remember I don't have my bike yet so I really don't have a clue yet as to what I am talking about) but it 'seems' to me that when you put a FF on with the visor down, that you're kinda back in a box, behind glass again... no?

Maybe it's just as simple as "safety trumps" and that's that...

Maybe I just need to wait till I experience this when winter is over and I am done with the BRC and actually getting some ride time in... but I'd like to hear your thoughts on this.
I have a full face helmet. It's not at all like being in a cage. It's pretty comfortable, keeps wind off your face and eyes. Wind and light debris that is. And on mine you can pop open th3 visor a little or a lot depending on conditions.

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post #19 of 64 (permalink) Old 01-04-2017, 05:37 PM
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Welcome gunslinger. Great questions you've asked, just about cover everything a new rider will want to know.

I'd recommend a lighter and second hand bike to learn on. At the age of 60 I started out on a used Hyosung GV250 learner cruiser and did 34,000 km on it. I didn't start pillioning until I got a later/bigger bike. But do the safety courses, do every safety course you can find.

But I think something in the 650 to 800 size mid cruiser should be OK, someone suggested the Honda Shadow, there's the Yamaha V-Star 650, Susuki Boulevard S40 (650 cc) and C50 and M50 (800) and the Kawasaki 900 that would all make good learner bikes. But choose the one which fits you best, go the rounds of the dealers and sit on them all. Leave a Harley until you've got some experience, the bigger bikes are heavier and have a bit less clearance than some other bikes. Get a second hand bike, you will drop it while parking it or at slow parking lot speed - just about everyone does.

Ape hangers? I don't see the need for them, if you want them then try them out and fit them after you've become proficient with riding normal cruiser bars.

You'll find that a mid size cruiser like the above will have a range of 200 + miles, so you'll get plenty of leg stretching on a longer ride. My recommendation is don't drink and ride AT ALL! I think that I don't have enough riding experience to be able to afford to lower my skill level by drinking and riding, so I just avoid mixing alcohol and riding.

Once you start riding you'll notice other riders in your area, you'll stop to chat with other riders at service stations, you will find other riders around. Look for specific make forums on the net once you've got a bike, that way the other riders will likely be more attuned to you and your bike and they can help you with bike problems.

But, always ride your own ride, don't let others push the pace, drop back if needed as they'll wait for you. If they don't then you shouldn't be riding with them.

Helmet and gear. ATGATT - all the gear all the time! It'll save skin and injury. FF or modular (flip front) helmet is my suggestion, and always wear boots, armoured pants and jacket and gloves. I had a disagreement with a taxi which pulled across my lane about 5 weeks ago and ended up sliding down the road - wore a hole in the toe of my boot and polished the steel cap inside, wore out the elbows of my jacket, the knee of my pants and scratched the visor of my helmet - all wear points that would have seen my skin torn off on the road if I hadn't been wearing my gear. There's a saying, dress for the slide, not for the ride.

But most of all, have fun.
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post #20 of 64 (permalink) Old 01-04-2017, 05:38 PM
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but it 'seems' to me that when you put a FF on with the visor down, that you're kinda back in a box, behind glass again... no?
That's what it feels like to me, and why I haven't worn a full face helmet in about 35 years. I wear a half helmet most of the time as I do like the wind on my face and the feeling of riding in the wind. (Most of the time. )

Of course, it also makes me want to try harder not to crash.
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post #21 of 64 (permalink) Old 01-04-2017, 07:20 PM
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Asking which is the best helmet is like asking what is the best oil or best tire. Everyone will have a different answer.

I have:

Full face
Modular
3/4
and a 1/2

I mostly wear the modular and 3/4. As a beginner you might want to start with more then work your way down it it is uncomfortable.

Just remember that all helmets are not the same, some are rounder and some a little oblong (inside) An XL from one maker may or not be the same size as an XL from another.

So bite the bullet go to a shop with a lot of helmets (or a bike show) and try on many many helmets until you find the one you want.


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post #22 of 64 (permalink) Old 01-05-2017, 04:59 AM
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Hearing protection is a must have item. I ordered a trial set from some place on line that cost me an=bout $10 but let me try lots of samples to find a good fit .After that I ordered a lifetime supply for about $15 of the ones that fit best. I call it a lifetime supply because I go through 2 or 3 pairs each year and I got 50 pairs in the package.
As far as helmets, the ones that fit you are the ones you are likely to wear so get one that fits well with no tight spots but not loose either. After that it comes down to how much you want to spend for added features since they all work about the same. I have found the HJC series fit me fairly well but that is my head shape, not yours.


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post #23 of 64 (permalink) Old 01-05-2017, 05:37 AM
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I got a couple good pairs of ear plugs on a string from Gander Mountain in the hunting/guns section. They work well and clean easily.

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post #24 of 64 (permalink) Old 01-05-2017, 10:21 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks everyone, very helpful!
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post #25 of 64 (permalink) Old 01-05-2017, 04:00 PM Thread Starter
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So... after reading a lot on here, I'm feeling a little more nervous (I mean I have always felt a healthy fear/respect for riding which is why I am just now at 43 ready to go for it). Does EVERYONE crash from time to time? I am not talking about dropping the bike while stopped, I get that, but real crashes? I do not plan to commute on the bike (I work from home or out of town), but want it for evening rides (probably 1 or 2 a week realistically) and weekends. I will take the riding courses starting with the BRC and then more after that in time, but if it is a given (statistically speaking) that crashes come with riding I need to give that some thought.

I don't plan on riding freeways (to the extent possible), nor do I want to do long road trips, I am looking for country back roads in the mountains (going west) and out in the plains (going east).
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post #26 of 64 (permalink) Old 01-05-2017, 04:14 PM
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Quote:
Does EVERYONE crash from time to time? I am not talking about dropping the bike while stopped, I get that, but real crashes?
Short answer is no. I've been riding 40 years and have only had two crash accidents, both of which was the cage drivers fault. I have a couple of buddies who have never crashed.
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post #27 of 64 (permalink) Old 01-05-2017, 06:04 PM
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If you're concerned for your safety then by all means avoid those activities which have a higher risk of being dangerous or deadly, such as smoking, drinking to excess, not exercising, over eating, and so on.

Most motorcyclists don't crash. Of those that do my belief is that many of those could have been prevented by the rider. But over all I'd guess you're more likely to crap the bed because of heart disease you might have been able to avoid, as opposed to a motorcycle crash you could not avoid.
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post #28 of 64 (permalink) Old 01-05-2017, 07:01 PM Thread Starter
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If you're concerned for your safety then by all means avoid those activities which have a higher risk of being dangerous or deadly, such as smoking, drinking to excess, not exercising, over eating, and so on.
actually, I don't smoke or drink, I do exercise.. a little, I don't over eat, usually... lol

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Most motorcyclists don't crash. Of those that do my belief is that many of those could have been prevented by the rider. But over all I'd guess you're more likely to crap the bed because of heart disease you might have been able to avoid, as opposed to a motorcycle crash you could not avoid.
thanks, I do care about my safety, but I want to live life too, I scuba dive for example, that's got risk too, I camp in bear country, shoot guns, and have jumped off bridges into rivers in my youth too (even at night so it's all relative I suppose, thanks for talking me down off the ledge...

I used to ride horses as a kid (teen) even broke in a few, now it's time for a steel horse (shout out to Bon Jovi on that one)
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post #29 of 64 (permalink) Old 01-05-2017, 07:24 PM
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That sounds like a pretty good attitude.

And look at it like this: If you ride, more then likely you're going to survive it without injury. The odds are greatly in your favor.

However, there is a chance you may crash and you may be injured and possibly killed. But if you choose not to ride there's a very real chance you'll spend the rest of your life wishing you did and feeling the pangs of envy and desire every time a bike passes you by. I think that would hurt much worse.
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post #30 of 64 (permalink) Old 01-05-2017, 07:37 PM Thread Starter
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AMEN! i have been feeling that hurt for a long time now

my wife laughs at me (or did) when bikes go by and i'd say... "hey! there's my peeps" or something silly like that, she never understood till recently how serious i was, i still don't think she understands, but we've come to an understanding that the time has come for me to do this...

funny story... when my youngest daughter Ellie was only a few yrs old (so about 8 yrs ago now) she was sitting in the car seat and a fella on a bike rolled up next to us all in black leathers and black bike and so forth and she looked over and in her little voice said ."Oooooo there's a bad guy" I have no idea where she picked that up from, but it totally cracked me up, still does.
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post #31 of 64 (permalink) Old 01-05-2017, 08:29 PM
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Understanding and accepting the risks are important before getting out on the road. Statistically, riding is many times more dangerous than driving in a car, but probably safer than BASE jumping.

Controlled-access freeways are one of the safest places to ride. They are missing the most likely things to down a rider; sharp turns taken incorrectly and cross traffic.

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post #32 of 64 (permalink) Old 01-05-2017, 08:47 PM
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Managing risk is just a part of life - everything has some risk to it. Honestly I personally feel that most of the increased risk of riding can be mitigated just by riding like a human with a brain - good riding habits, defensive riding, etc. If you work at it you will develop a sense for situations (and drivers) which are dangerous and require more attention. It's not fool proof, but you do learn who to watch and when to slow down (or get out of there!) And like was said above, I'd rather be on this side of it than regret it when I'm 80.

Some folks have to work dangerous jobs for a living. The rest sit at a desk which is dangerous in itself. It's a part of life, just accept it and manage it.

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post #33 of 64 (permalink) Old 01-06-2017, 04:22 AM
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I suspect those that crash, if they were very honest with themselves, would have to say they could have avoided any crash they were in. I know that's true in the one I had. Reading the road and traffic is a skill in and of itself though. But even that can be as simple as, if it can go wrong it will. Cross traffic conditions are the most dangerous. As one person said, freeways are actually safer because of that. Life has risks. But I truly believe most motorcycle accidents could have been avoided. Speed being one area where you have the control. Where you position yourself in stop and go traffic. There is much more to riding than just twisting the throttle but you do have control of most if not all of it in some form.

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Quote:
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AMEN! i have been feeling that hurt for a long time now

my wife laughs at me (or did) when bikes go by and i'd say... "hey! there's my peeps" or something silly like that, she never understood till recently how serious i was, i still don't think she understands, but we've come to an understanding that the time has come for me to do this...

funny story... when my youngest daughter Ellie was only a few yrs old (so about 8 yrs ago now) she was sitting in the car seat and a fella on a bike rolled up next to us all in black leathers and black bike and so forth and she looked over and in her little voice said ."Oooooo there's a bad guy" I have no idea where she picked that up from, but it totally cracked me up, still does.
That's adorable-kids have the greatest perception.

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post #35 of 64 (permalink) Old 01-09-2017, 09:21 PM Thread Starter
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I might be able to get a 2013 Shadow Phantom with only 700 miles for $4K in mint condition

I know I was going to wait till after my class (which is in 2 weeks) but that Shadow seems like a good bike (i really like the phantoms) and price...so...I might jump on it before it's gone

any strenuous objections?

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post #36 of 64 (permalink) Old 01-09-2017, 11:16 PM
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I don't know a thing about Honda pricing, but if you've done your due and diligent research and it seems like a good price, and you like the bike, and you're as certain as you can be that it doesn't have some kind of effed up strings like it was crashed or in a flood or something, then go make an offer and bring it home.

No matter what you do, or how safe you try to be, there are risks involved in riding motorcycles. Buying one is just the first of many you will take.
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post #37 of 64 (permalink) Old 01-10-2017, 04:41 AM
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↑↑↑↑↑ What he says. The big question is why does a bike that's 4 years old only have 700 miles on it. That would mean it hasn't had the break-in oil replaced or any of the first adjustments made. Chances are goo that the battery would be shot too if it's been allowed to just sit there all this time. It sounds good on the surface but that bike will need a good service right off the bat. That first service the bike should have received may include a valve adjustment. So was that done or not. Does it have any recalls that should have been done. If I remember correctly there were several brake recalls. As and experienced rider I'd take the chance maybe but a new rider, are you willing to bring the bike back to fully serviced condition. That could potentially be a lot more $$$$ added to that purchase price. The recalls a dealer is obliged to do though.
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post #38 of 64 (permalink) Old 01-10-2017, 06:53 AM Thread Starter
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good question, it's bank owned due to a repo, I don't know the full history or story but now a bike shop has it (a reputable one here in Denver from what I hear) and they are selling it on behalf of the bank. I don't know if it has had any service done to it, I doubt it, it really does look brand new. I will ask more questions.
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post #39 of 64 (permalink) Old 01-10-2017, 07:00 AM Thread Starter
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Looks like there has been one recall, I doubt its been taken care of on the bike, but I could get this taken care of



NHTSA recall Number: TBD
Campaign Description: '10-'16 VT750 BAS RECALL
mfr campaign id: JW7
recall date: 12/11/2015
recall status: VIN/HIN Required
Summary:
AMERICAN HONDA MOTOR CO., INC. (HONDA) IS RECALLING CERTAIN MODEL YEAR VT750 MOTORCYCLES. ENGINE VIBRATION MAY CAUSE THE BANK ANGLE SENSOR WIRING TO RUB ON THE WIRE HARNESS JOINT CONNECTOR. CONTINUOUS VIBRATION BETWEEN THE BANK ANGLE SENSOR WIRING AND THE WIRE HARNESS JOINT CONNECTOR MAY CREATE AN OPEN IN THE BANK ANGLE SENSOR ELECTRICAL CIRCUIT.
SAFETY RISK:
IF AN OPEN IN THE BANK ANGLE SENSOR ELECTRICAL CIRCUIT DEVELOPS, THE ENGINE MAY STALL WHILE RIDING. AN ENGINE STALL WHILE RIDING INCREASES THE RISK OF A CRASH.
REMEDY:
HONDA WILL NOTIFY OWNERS, AND DEALERS WILL WILL RELOCATE THE JOINT CONNECTOR AND REPLACE THE BANK ANGLE SENSOR FREE OF CHARGE. OWNERS MAY CONTACT HONDA MOTORCYCLE CUSTOMER SUPPORT AT 1-866-784-1870. HONDA'S NUMBER FOR THIS RECALL IS JW7.
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post #40 of 64 (permalink) Old 01-10-2017, 07:02 AM
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If it's a good price I wouldn't be afraid of getting the bike. Just be aware you might have to do a few things to it once you get it.
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