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post #1 of 7 (permalink) Old 11-24-2016, 09:08 PM Thread Starter
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First Bike Tall Thin Rider

Hey everyone! I've been searching all over the internet for good beginner bikes for tall riders. Most posts/videos I come across are for tall big riders. I'm 6'5" 210 lbs, 34" inseam. I've been a big sucker for the cafe racer styled bikes for years and I am finally ready to jump in. I know these bikes are probably the worst for tall riders but if any of them would fit I would love to start there. I've found several CB550's and CB750's that I really like. Do you think these would be a good place to start? I have friends that tell me nothing under 1,000 cc for my size but I can't help but feel they are just saying that because that's what they ride now. Thanks for the help!
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post #2 of 7 (permalink) Old 11-25-2016, 12:21 AM
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Originally Posted by dizzo810 View Post
I've found several CB550's and CB750's that I really like. Do you think these would be a good place to start? I have friends that tell me nothing under 1,000 cc for my size but I can't help but feel they are just saying that because that's what they ride now.
Fit is particularly important on a motorcycle, so I would suggest going and sitting on some to see what you like. You may be surprised about what works for you. Some taller riders gravitate towards dual sports cause they're taller. You certainly can start on a 1000cc bike, but I think most advise a smaller more nimble bike as a first bike. They'll allow you to increase your skill set more quickly than a larger bike. A larger bike requires more skills, which you won't have when you're first starting out. Then when you are ready, the big bikes will still be there. If you've not taken the BRC, you might want to before deciding on what bike to get.

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post #3 of 7 (permalink) Old 11-25-2016, 02:11 AM Thread Starter
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Yeah that makes a lot of sense to wait after I take BRC. Maybe I'm too eager right now but I've seen some great "winter deals" popping up. Knowing myself I'm not the type of person that's wanting a big powerful bike. Maybe that's what everyone says when they start out but I really see myself finding a bike that's the right fit and just sticking with it. Im looking for a fun ride and Just something to learn the ropes on. Thanks for your input!
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post #4 of 7 (permalink) Old 11-25-2016, 03:22 AM
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I would agree with the dual sport idea. So many people end up lowering them 2" or so because they seem to be built for a really tall rider. Something like a KLR650 or a DR650 would be something to consider.
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post #5 of 7 (permalink) Old 11-25-2016, 07:11 PM
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Ignore your friends. A typical liter bike is a 4 cylinder that will inflict great pain on you. You want, as a new rider, a mild mannered bike. I would stay under 650cc and no more than a twin cylinder. My own favorite bikes are the Victorys but they are mostly made for experienced riders. How about a nice Kawasaki or a Honda twin with a 650cc displacement? Even the Yamaha Star series would be good as long as you stay at the small end of the displacements.
This guy has some thoughts that are well worth considering.


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post #6 of 7 (permalink) Old 11-27-2016, 03:06 PM
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My first ride is an 88 cu in (around 1440 cc) HD Road King . At around 750 lbs, not real beginner friendly. Throttle on it is not a problem though, real user friendly. The biggest problem with a big bike is the big weight. It really increases the learning curve as far as handling goes, especially slow speed handling. Thats not to say you CAN'T start out at this level, I just don't personally recommend it. As stated previously, throttle control on this bike is real user friendly, but in the first couple of days of riding I made the mistake of twisting the throttle a bit too vigorously and thought I was going off the back of the bike. So, what do you think would have been the results of this on a hair trigger throttle, 1000 cc sport bike? I recommend smaller engine and lighter weight to start with. The more it feels like a bicycle the more comfortable you'll be. There's enough to worry about your first time(s) on the road without having to worry about a touchy throttle and a bike that's too heavy to stop from tipping or too hard to pick up if you drop it.

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post #7 of 7 (permalink) Old 12-01-2016, 11:32 PM
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I would agree with the comments above about a dual sport. I was recently bike shopping and almost went for a klr650 but I'm only 5'11" so it was too tall for me. That being said everything else about it was great. It handled great for a dual sport and was fast enough to go highway speeds but wasn't anything crazy. Once again though, just sit on the bikes you want and go with what feels good.
Just a tip, if you go for those older cafe bikes you need to be prepared to work on them or fork out some cash. Learn how carbs work and how to troubleshoot electrical issues. Not trying to push you away from those, just giving you a heads up.
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